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BadBob

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2017-05-11 04.22.14 - Wooden Toy - Trailer - Truck - Pink - Bat Car- Orange - Car Hauler.jpg 2017-05-11 04.22.14 - Wooden Toy - Trailer - Truck - Pink - Bat Car- Orange - Car Hauler

There are two different brands and shades of paint used here. Not intentionally. Someone decided ti would be OK to thin the paint directly in the can and the dark pink was unusable when I got it out. I learned since then that you should never thin paint you want to keep with tap water. Chemicals in the water can react with the paint and cause it to do strange things. Like set up hard inside the can. Forget keeping paint thined with other chemicals. That will not happen again. Not to me anyway.

The lighter pink on the trailer is Glidden and the cab is painted with Behr. Both are Oops paint from Home Depot. The Glidden paint on the trailer is flat so I coated it with clear shellac to brighten it up a bit and add a bit of durability.

The wheels on the cab are my first "successful" attempt at flush cutting the axles. Successful in that it was still usable when I got done.

The cab is made from BC plywood junk from home depot One of two that made it far enough to get painted. Once again the trailer is southern yellow pine with a spruce under carriage.

This is the car hauler trailer. The play Pal cars stay on the trailer up tp about 45 degrees and all the hot wheels cars I tested did the same. Even the Play Pal Van with its slightly longer wheel base fits. Pure luck. I made no attempt to measure for the trailer length. After I made my first one I realized that the length would not matter in most cases unless it was crazy long. I just squared the ends and made a trailer. The trailer beds are made from wood left from building a rocking horse. All of the trailers are different lengths.

One of the nice thing about making small toys is that there is little that goes to waste.

#WoodenToys #WoodToys #WoodenToyTruck #WoodToyTruck #OdinsToyFactory #Handmade #PlayPal


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ed357sw

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Reply with quote  #2 
Looking good....
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ed357sw

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Reply with quote  #3 
Badbob,

I have a neat little trick that i use to flush my axles.
It is really simple and much works every time.

You take a old expired credit card or gift card and cut it in say 2 inch squares. after that you notch a cut out for the size of the axle you are using, this will be used to slide over the axle. So you take a wheel and flush it on one end and slide it into the axle hole with the shim you just made between the wheel.
This gives perfect distance for spacing as you will see in a minute.

Anyway you put the next shim on the other side and then push your wheel up against it as well.
Then I use a .5mm I think it is pencil, and mark the axle right up flush with the hub.

I then remove the wheels and axle cut on the mark and now have a perfect fitting axle.
If all my axles are the same i just use the first one for a template and have matching axles.
I then glue the first wheel to all the axles flush. After drying I slide the wheel in place using a shim, and on the other side I put the shim in place and then drop some glue on the axle, slide the other wheel on flush and your done. remove shims and your wheels are perfectly matched and just the right distance from the body for smooth rolling.
Hopefully this makes sense, did not mean to be long winded but this made a huge difference to me in getting axles in position and works every time...

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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #4 
Makes perfect sense. 
I too use the old credit card trick as a spacer, but I make the axles longer so they protrude a bit from the wheel. I then go over them with a little drum sander on my dremel to sand them flat. 
Works a treat. 

I have one of the rechargeable Dremels. It is so handy and soooo much easier being a cordless tool without a power cord getting in the way.

Cheers
Rod T
BadBob

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ed357sw, That is almost exactly what I do except for I use a washer for a spacer.

If I want them flush I found that the Veritas flush cutting saw works better than anything. I'm way to clumsy to use a drum sander. Or perhaps to picky.

05k3401s3.jpg 



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PaPa Jack

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Reply with quote  #6 
Rod t, I do the same process except if cut off any protruding axle with the band saw.   Cuts a smooth end for me.   I would like to know how you use the Dremel.  Do you use sanding drums or a sanding stone.  I have elec Dremel but do not know if the battery operated would last all day using.  Also do you use it to rould off edges of small items.  Still looking for something to do that with.  Sanding mop did not do enough cutting.  Any comments will be welcomed!
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Another shot of the car hauler without the car.

It's a little rougher than I like my toys to be but this was intended to be an experiment but would up being a toy. If my grandson had not been so taken by these little trucks they might have gone into the trash. Just goes to show you that little children don't care much about the fit and finish of a toy.

2017-05-11 04.22.32 - Wooden Toy - Play Pal - Trailer - Truck - Pink.jpg  2017-05-11 04.22.32 - Wooden Toy - Play Pal - Trailer - Truck - Pink



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john lewman

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Reply with quote  #8 
I always enjoy your posts about wood toy making. The Odin's toy products are especially interesting.
Rod T

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Guys

Here are a couple of pictures to show what I do. 
Not wanting to hijack Bob's post here, but just answering PapJack's questions etc. 
I don't think this method would work too well when you want to paint just the axle end as a hub cap like I have seen Bob do here, as doing them this way makes them flush with the wheels.

The car body is all finished and waxed etc. so this is the last stage of making it.
I start with roughly measuring the dowel. Having it protrude a little bit on each side. Not accurate, I just want it to protrude on both sides when glued on.


IMG_1695.JPG  IMG_1696.JPG 
I then cut them to length using a little home made jig. Basically a piece of floor board with the groove on the top to lay the dowels into. The piece on the left conveniently fits snuggly for a stop.

IMG_1697.JPG 
This is the glue I have been using. Super Glue is pretty much the same whatever brand, but I find these squeeze bottles a lot better than tubes. No wastage and the cap goes back on very well.

IMG_1698.JPG 
A few drops in the wheel and then push the axle in until it protrudes about 1-2mm on the other side.
Have to do this quick and in one motion as the glue dries nearly instantly.

IMG_1699.JPG  IMG_1700.JPG 
I then put the axle through the car and use an old credit card cut to use as a spacer.

IMG_1701.JPG  IMG_1702.JPG 
Then glue the other wheel on. This I just push all the way to the body, as the spacer on the other side creates enough space for the wheels to spin freely.
 
IMG_1703.JPG 
As you can see I made this axle a bit long. No matter, I prefer a bit long over a bit short.
I then cut off the excess so there is less to sand. I don't cut flush, I leave 1-2mm for sanding.


IMG_1704.JPG 

This is the cordless Dremel that I have. It is quite small and light. There is a charging cradle for it that it sits in when not in use. I haven't had any problems with running out of charge, I tend to batch this process with anything up to 10 cars at a time and it keeps going.
It hangs around on my bench as I am doing this process and then I just put it back on the cradle so that it is always freshly charged. 

I don't tend to use it for much else though.
The finest sanding drum seems to be about 150 grit, so pretty rough and they are too large to fit inside the windows of these small cars.
To answer PapJack's question about rounding off edges, I don't use this tool. It would be too rough.
I sometimes use a very small diameter router bit, which works nicely, but I find I still have to do hand sand anyway to finish it off.
A lot of the time for edge sanding I tend to just hand sand with 180grit and then 240grit paper. 
This is how this toy was finished.
I keep looking for easier and better ways to do this as hand sanding is such a drag.


IMG_1705.JPG  IMG_1706.JPG 
Hard to photograph this, but this is the technique I use to sand the axles flush.
I have found that if I hold the car so that I can have 1 finger on the apposing wheel I can spin the wheel as I am sanding.
As the sanding progresses, the drum wants to spin the wheel itself, so I use this finger to act as a brake to slow it down. With a bit of practise I have found that letting the wheel spin a bit, the final sand is really smooth and nicely flush. If the wheel stays stationery then there is a risk of creating a groove with the drum. A bit hard to explain, but this spinning technique seems to be the key.

Light pressure only. This dremel tool also has a speed adjustment, I use it on about half speed.

Care also needs to be taken not to touch the tyre section of the wheel. 
Found this out the hard way...

IMG_1707.JPG 
Flush and also smooth finish.

IMG_1708.JPG  IMG_1709.JPG 
I then use the butcher block wax to finish them off. 

IMG_1710.JPG 
All finished. 
The car body is Silky Oak
IMG_1711.JPG  IMG_1712.JPG  IMG_1713.JPG 

Cheers
Rod T




BadBob

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Reply with quote  #10 
Ah ha moment. Your sanding them flush on wheels look bigger than I was using and on the ones I have the center of the wheel is flush to the outside edge of the wheel. If I sand the center I wind ups sanding the whole outside of the wheel.

I kept wondering how you used a sanding drum with out messing up the wheel. As soon as I saw the photos I understood.

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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Bob

I use the same technique on smaller wheels and with smaller diam dowels etc.
It is a lot more fiddly with a higher risk of touching the outside of the wheels though.
I generally sand on a slight angle and only use the tip of the drum.
It would be really handy to source a smaller drum.
I have tried a few of the different bits that fit the Dremel, I keep coming back to the drum sander.

I find once the wheel is spinning a bit I don't have to move the drum back and forth, it can pretty much stay in the same place.

I'll see if I can find a couple of cars with the smaller wheels (3/4") and take some photos.

Cheers
Rod T
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