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Wooddawg

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Reply with quote  #1 
It seems the trend is to enlarge a project, which makes me happy. I seem to do better with the larger builds. I love the small builds, just not as good at it as I would like to be. Got off task, sorry.

Do you print the plans at 100%, then enlarge them with printer or copy machine? Do the plans stay at scale? For example, the 3" scale at the top of our plans is no longer accurate, but are the actual plans accurate? Can I go from the 100% to say 150% and then get my measurements from the new printed size? Measure the enlarged tire and that be the new size. In other words, "What you see is what you get!"

Or...Is there a formula to use for extraction of the new measurements for the build? And I thought I was good with math.

Wow, this was a mouth full in trying to word it correctly.

Thanks so much for your help. Don
Peter B

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Reply with quote  #2 
Don from what i have enlarged and from how you explaned it sounds to me you got the maths right
Rod T

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Reply with quote  #3 
Either print at the desired percentage or print at 100% and enlarge at the percentage on a photocopier. Both work fine.

I used the maths to work out an appropriate percentage for enlarging the plans to suit the wheels I had on hand. For instance, with the 1969 Mustang I did the other day. The plan called for 3/4" wheels and I had 1 1/2" wheels, which is 200%. This is how I arrived at 200%, the wheel size dictated this as I only had certain sizes of wheels. Once the plan was printed at 200% the 3" scale at the top became 6".

I too enjoy slightly bigger toys, the Mustang @ 200% was a lot of fun. It would be pretty fiddly at 100% size.

I have bought a few other plans that call for wheel sizes that I don't have, so I can now make these toys. It wasn't until I saw Cindy and PeterB do it this way that it became obvious. Pretty simple really, just needed to see it.

Sorry, I can babble on a bit. 3.30am and 1 yr old is bawling.....

Cheers
Rod T
ctowne

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Reply with quote  #4 
What everyone said pretty much sums it up.  The only thing is you have to do the math for the width as well.  The plans are prefect proportions for all the profiles that are cut out but you have to also sum math to the widths of the piece.   Ex - Rod's mustang.  the outside piece, plan calls for 1/4" but now can be 1/2".  He also added for the body.  the plan calls for 1.5" center and he added the 1/2" center stipe and the 2  1/4" pieces.   What helped me with the width issue was looking at other plans that had the tire size I wanted to used and make my enlarged or reduced plan close to the same width. 
Just some more babble and I do not have a 1 yr old bawling. 
Hope this helps.
kenbod

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Reply with quote  #5 
 I just enlarge by the addition percentage ie 100 to 125 and print at this level just upgrade width by additional percentage. works fine for me as i cut my own wheels. Too expensive in UK to buy.
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Wooddawg

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks all really cleared it up. I will need to study wood size some. Will do some practice first then put it to work. I am working on building the Freightliner 3 Truck Plans. Doing some mods, and this is something I am not use to doing. I have limited experience in working with wood and learn something new everyday. I do have another question that I am posting under a different heading.

Don
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #7 
I extract the image from the PDF, enlarge or shrink it to the size I want, save as a new file and paste the ruler from the old file into the new one. You must kyep thee dpi the same for this to work. Its a bit complicated but I can do it without leaving my house and I can print more anytime I want.

An alternate method is to use graphics software (gimp) tools to do your measuring. Most good graphics software will have tools to do this.


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gazz

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Reply with quote  #8 
I have just made the ciccareili at 125% I used adobe pdf to resize it, just used the percentage box and printed it as a poster. Then used digital vernier calipers to measure the sizes of the line drawings cut the wood to size, it probably helped that the wheels were part of the plan.
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calhanton

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Reply with quote  #9 
I have done the same with the King Ranch 150 as the plan called for 2" wheels and I only had 2.25" so simply printed at 115% on my Epson Workforce. You may have to use A3 paper, but tell the printer the source is A4. works fine, and then just use the calculator on the phone to upsize all the parts accordingly.
Wooddawg

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Reply with quote  #10 
I pulled out my old laptop and printed some of the new plans from it. A print dialog box appeared with all the needed elements for printing with modifications in size.

Determined that when one goes to Windows 10, and start to print/read/or otherwise use a .pdf file...it will be done in Adobe's cloud, Adobe's rules and regs with their defaults. This will require us to print, then enlarge to the size we desire. Even to 100%.

The plans still saved to your hard drive, at least for now.

The only other thing I see is to get Adobe to make allowances for those of us who print drawings without margins and need the 100% to start with.

What do you guys think about this, losing more control.

...Don
kangaroopaws

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi I use Rapid Resizer downloaded from the net it is great I use all the time, you can adjust patterns easily and save them in the size you want, it prints on multiply pages and you stick them together
cheers rob
DEW

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Reply with quote  #12 
i have been useing "bigprint" to enlarge prints  been working good for me so far,going to check out rabid resizer
toynut

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Reply with quote  #13 
It's fun and amusing being an old woodworking dinosaur living in the age of the button pusher. There was a time before photocopiers, computers and scanners, but still we transferred and resized patterns at will. Truth is, I like to push buttons as much as the next guy but there are times when going dinosaur works best. One of the oldest methods, that I know of, is the grid method. Simply draw a grid work over the pattern and redraw it on whatever size grid you want. The grid method is practically limitless, you can take a small rocking horse picture from a newspaper and redraw it to a size that an adult could ride. Other tools, commonly used for plan resizing, and still available, are the pantogragh and the magic lantern.

Why use old methods in a time of high tech? You can redraw any pattern to any size with any changes desired. The grid method even works on plans not drawn to scale (in blueprint style) by transferring the dimensions given to the grid. So, if the mood strikes, push a few more buttons and tune into the past. The how-to information is readily available on the web.  

Bucko

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Reply with quote  #14 
In response to toynut's post, there are times I enjoy taking a grid pattern from a book and transferring it to a paper pattern. I keep 1/4"and 1/2" grid paper on hand here at home for such uses. I've even found myself tracing a pattern from a book to use and find it quite rewarding when looking at the finished item.
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