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Frankg

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Reply with quote  #1 
I keep reading PGT blades last longer. What does that mean?? How much longer? Anyone know?
Thanks

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cynthia lewman

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Frank,

PGT (Precision Ground Tooth) scroll saw blades are milled on both sides of the blade to insure an even blade thickness as compared to regular scroll saw blades that are stamped steel. The even blade thickness allows you to cut straight with less effort. Stamped blades veer to one side while cutting and you have to continually correct the path to keep the blade from veering off.

In our estimation PGT scroll saw blades are worth the investment and in some cases are not more expensive than stamped blades. We recommend using PGT blades. 
Udie

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Reply with quote  #3 
Frankg - Cynthia's description is right on the money, thank you Cynthia for your post.
I think PGT blades might be a trademark name of scroll saw blades exclusive to Olson.
I also believe that they are only available as pinless, they are not available as pinned blades.
Flying Dutchman has FD-SR scroll saw blades that are advertised as being comparable to the PGT series.
If any member knows of another source for PGT blades we would love to hear about it.



kp91

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Reply with quote  #4 
Frank,
   I don't know how much 'longer' they last, but they definitely make scrolling more enjoyable.  I don't fight the saw, and don't seem to break them when using them. The Olson ones really aren't that expensive at all.  You can find them all over the place for around $4.50 a dozen, cheaper by the gross.
    I am very hard on blades, often pushing them longer than I should.  These blades can make it all the way through a project without showing much change at all in the cut.  I have used the 'cheapo' blades and had to change 3 or 4 times, or breaking them trying to get the last inch of cut.
   If you factor all these things together, they are 'cheaper' in the long run.

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kp91

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Reply with quote  #5 
I have ordered from the first two suppliers with good results.

http://www.pozsgaidesigns.com/page0002.htm

http://www.woodenteddybearonline.com/x/

http://www.seyco.com/category/blades.html

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Frankg

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Reply with quote  #6 
I ORDERED fLYING Dutchman BLADES. iS ANYONE ELSE USING THEM? ................ Aah! Get my CAPS LOCK off!!!
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Sdaupanner

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Reply with quote  #7 
   The Flying Dutchman Blades are the tops in what I do but I have been kind of spoiled with the spirals. They do a lot of the fret work that is required in Letters with out having to turn your project around as with a straight blade.

   Question: Storage of blades and in what .... I my self have found a company who sells test tubes made in plastic that I can buy by the gross and they come with a plug cap to keep these in order I have a few peices of Oak drilled out and then place these in wider Boards as you collection grows. Start with a 1" board about 8 inches long for the top shelf then make a Board about 2" wide and 8" long for the second shelf then just add an inch for every layer of shelving you need. O used I thing a 9/16 inch drill to drill the holes for the Test tubes to set in and they are placed about 1" on center from each other. This way each row allows one to see what is in each tube, I have also a tube that I keep for all of my broken Blades these are handy to use for different project like making gigs for cutting dowels and the what not. - Don
Frankg

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Reply with quote  #8 
So I'm scrolling 3/4" MFD. Lot of tight curvy cuts. What is the best blade # to use?? Right now I'm using a #7 standard blade. Flying Dutchman. Seems to be doing well. Any other recommendations?

Question at hand: Are standard teeth blade made in PGT?

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Sdaupanner

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Reply with quote  #9 
Frank,
     I use the spirals and find that as long as you allow them to do their work they do the best I do a lot of cuts that are for lettering.  I guess that would be for fret work. The size I use is in the 01 and 02 and the smaller the better but I think that the cutting is a bit slower with the smaller sizes. If you have never tried the Spirals give them a shot and if you don't have a lot of straight lines then the spirals. Another thing I like about the spirals is that the piece does not have to be turned you have the availability of cutting 360 degrees so it is easier to see what you are doing at all times or so I think.
schatzie

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Reply with quote  #10 
Just wanted to share my way of differentiating the many different scroll saw blades I have.  While I tend to use Flying Dutchman blades the most (which I order from MikesWorkshop.com), I do have a number of other sizes and types of blades and needed a way to identify them. I ended up ordering 1/2" by 6" screw top Shop Storage Tubes from Lee Valley ($5.80 for a pk of 10).  Then I printed out tiny labels for each tube with the size and type of blade. Before putting the blades in, I picked out a different acrylic paint color for each size and type of blade and put a dot of that color on the appropriate label.  I then took each group of blades and dabbed a little of the corresponding paint color on the top of each blade (you can see that I'm not too neat when I do this). To display the tubes for easy access, I used a rotating pen/pencil holder to hold the tubes, as you can see in the picture, but this requires gluing metal space rings on each tube to hold them erect. I have also put the description and a color dot below the hole that the tube goes in so I will know where to return it when I have removed it from the holder.  The rotating holder works fine but was a fair amount of work and if I had to do it again, I really think a system similar to Sdaupanner's description in the posting above would be much better for display. Painting the blades may seem like extra trouble but if I stop working for a day or two and wonder what blade is in the saw, I can recognize the blade instantly by the color or, if I have to change blades for a new project and the old blade is still good, I just stick it on the magnetic strip that I have attached to the front of my scroll saw and I can tell which blade it is if I want to reinsert it for a different project. Another advantage, Flying Dutchman blades have a dent in the top but for those blades that don't, the dot of color can also instantly identify the top of the blade. I also never have any problem with my blades slipping out of the top holder.  Don't know whether to attribute that to my scroll saw or the paint.  Hope this idea is of use to someone.  

blade storage-1.jpg   blade storage-2.jpg


BadBob

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Reply with quote  #11 
I use test tubes bought off ebay cheap. You can also get racks for them if you are so inclined. I cut the label from the blade package roll it and put it inside the tube. Until I gat a saw that had built in tube holders I kept all my blades in a plastic shoe box.


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dustyoldman

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by schatzie
....... Painting the blades may seem like extra trouble but if I stop working for a day or two and wonder what blade is in the saw, I can recognize the blade instantly by the color or, if I have to change blades for a new project and the old blade is still good, I just stick it on the magnetic strip that I have attached to the front of my scroll saw and I can tell which blade it is if I want to reinsert it for a different project.    



What I do to identify the blade in my saw is to write the details on a piece of masking tape w/ a Sharpie marker, and stick the tape to the upper arm. No fuss, no muss.

dom
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