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Colin Marshall_Toymaker

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santa sleigh and reindeer1.jpg 
Scroll Saw Magic 1949 Santa Christmas Sleigh

santa sleigh and reindeer2.jpg  santa sleigh and reindeer3.jpg  santa sleigh and reindeer4.jpg  This was an interesting build with lots of good practices on the scroll saw. santa sleigh and reindeer5.jpg


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Colin Marshall - Toymaker
Frogbucket

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Colin....Fantastic creation, I love the very high standard of your work and the colours look amazing...
john lewman

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Reply with quote  #3 
This is beautiful work Colin. And thanks for sharing the professionally done photographs. The quality of work is truly inspiring me this morning to get to work in the studio!
rob41245

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Reply with quote  #4 
I also made 6 sleighs however I modified my last one for my7 year old great niece who is a big fan of Elsa from (FROZEN)
It's not as nice as yours but I can say it's "cooler"

Rob DSC00186.jpg 

Rsorensen

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Reply with quote  #5 
Great looking Santa and sleigh. Question, how did you do Santa's beard.
Colin Marshall_Toymaker

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rsorensen
Great looking Santa and sleigh. Question, how did you do Santa's beard.


The beard effect is just simple brush work. Use the brush in a swirling motion to create a curly beard. My timber was off cuts and had a coat of acrylic clear finish was on it which I did not remove. This may have added to the effect, giving light and dark areas. It was all just trial and error and experimental.  

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Colin Marshall - Toymaker
Wombat

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Reply with quote  #7 
Colin,
         Showed this to my wife, who is a massive fan of anything Christmas.
She just smiled and said " Go to your Shed!!"
It will be Christmas 2020 before I can turn out anything that nice. 
 Bravo
Alan
Colin Marshall_Toymaker

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wombat
Colin,
         Showed this to my wife, who is a massive fan of anything Christmas.
She just smiled and said " Go to your Shed!!"
It will be Christmas 2020 before I can turn out anything that nice. 
 Bravo
Alan


Yes Alan, strange you should say that. All of the toys I make go on a market stall to help pay for the hobby and this one was destine for the same. When I showed it to MY wife, she said similar. "I want one!" She also loves anything Christmas. It sold at the market the first day I displayed it. I got $AU50.00 for it even though it is worth far more.

This is a hobby for me and not a business so I keep prices low to cover costs. That way I find that stock will turn over quicker. I make only one of everything and that keeps the hobby interesting. As I said, it is a hobby, and to mass produce would take the enjoyment and challenge element out of it.

When I first started I did mass produce some of the items and sure enough, it started to get a little monotonous and stale and more like a business. So, I made a policy to make only one of each project. If someone wants to order another one, then that is fine. I will always agree to that as I know it is being made to go to someone who will appreciate it. 

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Colin Marshall - Toymaker
Wombat

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Colin
I understand and agree with your philosophy.
The thrill of completing something new tends to wane after one has churned out a dozen more.
I would rather build 12 complex projects in a year than 1200 shaped blocks on wheels.
Both  options have their challenges, but as an old production engineer, I have done the mass production thing to death. Old habits die hard but I am trying.
I have a recollection of meeting you at Red Hill Market some time ago.
May yet do so again.
'til then
Alan
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #10 
Low prices do not necessarily result in higher sales. There is ample evidence that this is true. If you price it too low potential customers may think your products are defective or cheap in some way and look elsewhere. When you undervalue your work, you may be doing harm to other sellers as well.

It depends on your target market. Are you selling at shows that cater to the flea market crowd or are you selling at a juried show that charges admission and $150 booth fees? These are entirely different markets the only look the same on the surface. You can sell toys to the flea market crowd that you can make a 100 a day with a band saw and construction lumber. These will not get you in the door of a juried show and probably would not sell there.

Pricing is a very complex subject. The more I study it, the more I understand how hard it is to find the right formula. It has a lot to do with human psychology.  Blanket statements about how to set prices do not work in the real world.


 
 

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Colin Marshall_Toymaker

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wombat
Hi Colin
I understand and agree with your philosophy.
The thrill of completing something new tends to wane after one has churned out a dozen more.
I would rather build 12 complex projects in a year than 1200 shaped blocks on wheels.
Both  options have their challenges, but as an old production engineer, I have done the mass production thing to death. Old habits die hard but I am trying.
I have a recollection of meeting you at Red Hill Market some time ago.
May yet do so again.
'til then
Alan


G'day Allan,

I have never attended Red Hill Market As a Stall Holder. I only do the Mornington Racecourse every third Sunday, October to June. 

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Colin Marshall - Toymaker
Colin Marshall_Toymaker

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadBob
Low prices do not necessarily result in higher sales. There is ample evidence that this is true. If you price it too low potential customers may think your products are defective or cheap in some way and look elsewhere. When you undervalue your work, you may be doing harm to other sellers as well.

It depends on your target market. Are you selling at shows that cater to the flea market crowd or are you selling at a juried show that charges admission and $150 booth fees? These are entirely different markets the only look the same on the surface. You can sell toys to the flea market crowd that you can make a 100 a day with a band saw and construction lumber. These will not get you in the door of a juried show and probably would not sell there.

Pricing is a very complex subject. The more I study it, the more I understand how hard it is to find the right formula. It has a lot to do with human psychology.  Blanket statements about how to set prices do not work in the real world.


 
 


I attend a CRAFT market where every product has to be approved by their committee before you are allowed to display it for sale. There is nothing "flea" like about it at all! I get lots of lovely comments about my craft and the high quality. Frankly, I don't care about the money aspects of the HOBBY. Your philosophy is to much on the commercial side for me. I do this craft for MY enjoyment and the appreciation from the public, comes from there eyes and their mouths, Not only their pockets. If I sell something, that is a bonus and helps me with the financial costs of doing this hobby. But I do not rely on it for a living. If your product is good enough and people like it they will by it. The public are not stupid, they know a quick knock up when they see it. I agree that pricing an item can be very complex, but it is not an issue for me. I'll leave that for the profiteers among you. Me...... I just want to do my craft to the best of my ability and let people enjoy it. And you can't do that with high prices.

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Colin Marshall - Toymaker
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