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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've spent a large chunk of my weekend getting up to speed on air brushes. I didn't make a lot of progress until I connected with modellers. Modelling is very much like making toys. This video is the best info I have found. If your thinking about using an air brush  you should watch this. It's almost two hours long. So get comfortable.



There is also an interview video.


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IanPlant

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Reply with quote  #2 
Thanks for this BB i have just bought myself a small gravity feed air brush http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B016IASF2U?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00 to go with my air compressor as my old one http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silverline-380158-Airbrush-Hobby-6-Piece/dp/B002QS0ITC/ref=pd_sim_sbs_201_16?ie=UTF8&dpID=515TVBMZSSL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR152%2C160_&refRID=0RS0E9BK1D2WJARVSJSQ which had a jar on the bottom used to spit a lot 
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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #3 
I just purchased three Badger Air Brushes to use for toy painting. I bought the Badger 350 based on the information in these videos. The 350 is an external mix gun that can spray heavy paints easily and is designed for base coating which is what I'm doing when I paint toy cars. The spray pattern adjusts small enough to paint a Play Pal yet large enough to pain a rocking horse.

Why three air brushes?

The size of the tip what size pigment you can spray with it and the size of the droplets. Finer tips produce a smoother finish because the droplet size it produces is smaller.I want to be able to spray everything from Latex house paint to shellac. I think Latex house paint will require a heavy tip while shellac acn be sprayed with the fine tip because it has no pigments. Acrylics will be some where in the middle depending on the paint used. I expect acrylics will require medium to heavy tips to avoid tip dry.

I could have bought a kit with all the tips but when I looked at the cost it was $26 more to buy all the brushes. It's worth it to me not to have to keep track of all the fiddly bits.

I also purchased:

  • several paint jars
  • paint mixer used in the video
  • pressure regulator/water trap
  • Rack so I can put the brush down
  • The paint screen they had in the video it only fits good in my older jars
  • A wash bottle for cleaning solution/solvent
  • A bunch of disposable droppers/pipettes for transferring and mixing.

I have hoses and an air compressor so I didn't need that. I expect to need several bits to get it all hooked up but there isn't any way to tell exactly what I need until it all gets here.

At some point I expect to purchase a top loading detail brush. I find the the idea of being able to spray a single drop of paint very appealing. What would I do with a detail brush? The first thing that came to mind was painting flames on a Freaky Ford Hot Rod. [smile]





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IanPlant

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Reply with quote  #4 
My external mixer brush (like the 350) didnt come with a manual so have been struggling with it and most of the video's i have watched were using gravity feed brushes.

Having google'd the on one you bought i have found a copy of the Badger manual for the 350, it turned out i was not using high enough pressure, so have been up to my paint room to test my compressor. I can get a max and constant 20 psi which is about 10 psi lower than normal. It will pump up to 50 but when the trigger is pressed it drops to 20 psi

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #5 
Some pressure drop is normal.  However, you still may have the pressure to low for what you are doing. It all depends on different factors. The surface you are painting, the thickness of the paint, how fast it drys and the size of the pigment all combine to determine how much pressure you need.
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Reply with quote  #6 
the biggest problem i seem to have is getting the paint to flow out of the jar. also i worked out what i was doing wrong with my spraying I wasn't releasing the air just pressed and sprayed instead of stroke and release so was losing 30 psi
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IanPlant

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Reply with quote  #7 
Just added this brush to my collection

2016-01-29_095439.jpg 


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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #8 
I just ordered some parts from Badger to get a Badger 150 I bought at a yard sale that had some parts missing. Badger was very helpful. We exchanged several emails with photos and questions over several days. This airbrush was an older version of the 150 that wasn't on the web site. They emailed a manual to me and I was able to order the missing parts.

I also picked up a Master G-233 airbrush kit. Mainll to satisfy my curiosity. There are many conflicting reviews and comments on these air brushes I wanted to see for myself and try a top feed brush. They are cheap enough that I couldn't resist.

There are lots of cheap air brushes on eBay from China and Taiwan. I found them for as low as $11.95 delivered. At that price these are throw aways. These look like they are the same as the Master brand.

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john lewman

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Reply with quote  #9 
The more you guys discuss this the more I think about getting an airbrush setup put together. I used to do photo retouch and illustrations with an airbrush. I have never considered painting toys with it. Thanks for the posts. They are really helpful to me.
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #10 
For finishing toys you need a 5mm or Heavy tip. The size of the tip determines the size pigment you can spray. Oops paint and cheap craft paints have larger pigments and so need the larger tip sizes. You can get a smoother finish with a smaller tip but you will have more clogging. Latex house paint may not spray through the smaller tips at all. I use some finishes (shellac) that have no pigments but dry very fast so I may need to use larger tips.

If you willing to spend 7 to 10 dollars for a 2oz bottle of paint you can use the 2mm tips. There are smaller tips. I've seen a 1.8mm for sale. I don't know what you would spray with these. Ink or dyes maybe.

You might also want to look at touch up paint guns for those larger toys. Think rocking horse.

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IanPlant

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Reply with quote  #11 
I'm using acrylic paints and watering them down upto 50% with water, I finish off with a water based gloss varnish which i also water down 50% which sprays well and with a few coats looks great.

I dont use auto window screen fluid as it seem to contradict the point of using water base child friendly paints by adding detergent 

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #12 
Not using wind shield washer fluid for children's toys. I see your point.

After thinking about this for awhile it occurred to me that my grandson eats off dishes cleaned with soap, wears clothes wash in soap, and bathes in soap. Occasionally I've seen him drink his bath water with bubble bath in it. He plays with soap bubbles as well. His grand mother and his mom clean his toys when needed with soap.  I really don't think a little bit of soap in the paint is a problem.

The only reason I can see to use washer fluid is for its ability to slow the drying time. In some areas you may need to do this.

The retarder made for this purpose may simply be detergent/soap and water. I don't have any so I can't look at the ingredients.


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IanPlant

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Reply with quote  #13 
That is a good point, all though most are rinsed after washing, other than the bath water which i would think we have all done at some point in our lives [smile]

Also as you said it increases the drying time which isnt really a problem unless your making something that is needed straight away.

I also suppose that the washer fluid is only a problem if the child is young and is teething or is prone to bitting toys like my grandson who is 3 and autistic.

It is something i will have to look into as i can get a gallon for £3 which would last a long time

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