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jasonshanks

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Reply with quote  #1 
Ever since I made my first set of Hot Rod Freaky Fords, I've wanted to see what they would look like with angled pipes.  I recently saw an angled drilling jig on Woodsmith Video Edition so I decided to give it a try.  I think I like it. [smile]  

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Rod T

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They look great. Evenly spaced too, which is always tricky

Cheers
Rod T
Bucko

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Reply with quote  #3 
Nicely done with some nice photos showing your work
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #4 
I love the Freay ford Hot Rods. You might have noticed.

This looks great. It looks like two pieces of poplar.

I have been thinking about trying this myself. Any chance we can see a photo of the jig you used.

I to am a subscriber to the Woodsmith Video Edition.

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john lewman

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Reply with quote  #5 
This is fine craftsmanship at it's best. I noticed that the holes for the pipes are extremely clean. How did you achieve that while drilling at an angle? I love the look.
ctowne

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Reply with quote  #6 
Wow - those are great.  Perfectly spaced and angled.  Very nice. 
jasonshanks

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you all!  BadBob the jig is a smaller version of the one that is shown under the Shop Tips section of the Woodsmith Video Edition website.  Here is the URL: http://www.woodsmithvideoedition.com/tips/drill-press-angle-jig/

I've included some images of the jig below.  It was cold in the garage this morning so the lighting isn't great, but hopefully you can see them.  It takes a while for the florescent lights to warm up.

John, I also included an image of the drill setup.  When I have something that I think I will build a lot of, I make a hardboard pattern of your plans so I don't spend extra time printing and attaching them to the wood blanks.  When drilling, I use a brad point bit and make sure that the point of the bit is in the center of the circle while the drill is running (just judging it by eye).  I didn't drill the holes all the way through...just set the stop on my drill so that the hole is about 3/8 deep.  I start with the hole closest to the drill press and then work my way back.

By the way...I have to say two things:

1.  BadBob: the video you shared on the basic scroll sawing techniques was great!  I applied several of the techniques this weekend and really focused on getting them right while cutting these Fords out.  I found that I wasn't fighting the saw nearly as much as I used to...thanks for sharing such great info!

2.  John:  the level of craftsmanship is greatly enhanced by the quality of the plans on your site.  This is the only site that I've found that has plans with the level of detail that you provide, yet doesn't require you to have every tool known to man to make a great toy.  These are the best plans that I've found so far...so thank you very much!

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jasonshanks

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Reply with quote  #8 
I forgot to add that I cut the dowel for the pipes longer than necessary and at a 90 degree angle on both ends and glued them in. Once the glue was dry, I took a metal rule and marked a line that was perpendicular to the body of the car, which created the angles on the end of the pipes. Then, I went back to the scroll saw and cut the pipes on the line that I drew.  A little bit of work with a sanding block made sure that the pipe ends were the same length.
john lewman

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks for the excellent post on drilling angled holes in wood toys. This is very helpful to all of us. I can see that you are using a brad bit to create perfect holes. I am impressed!
Rod T

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Reply with quote  #10 
Great info Jason. 

I am going to make myself one of these jigs. 
I also like your method of cutting the pipes after they have been glued in. This will make them nice and even.
This could also be applied to headlights and such. It is always hard to get them the same length.

Thanks for sharing this, I am constantly picking up great tips from this forum. 

Cheers
Rod T

BadBob

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Reply with quote  #11 
I don't have a jig for angle drilling but I have used this technique many times in the past by butting a piece of plywood up against a fence and putting a stick of wood under it. It's not exactly repeatable bit it works.  I need to make one of these.

I to like to make templates. They have a couple of advantages. With the freaky Fords they let you mark the locations of axle and exhaust holes on the opposite side when not drilling through holes. Templates let you make better use of the material because you can see where you are putting everything and flip the template to get more pieces to fit. You can still use the tape for lubrication if you like. One down side is it's harder to see the lines.

Glad you liked the scroll saw video. I've tried to explain these techniques several times in the past but some times you just need to see it to undestand.



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