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rdredge

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi!  I make a lot of cars, trucks that are 1 1/2 wood.  I see on some post that the toymakers talk about sanding them for shape rather than scrolling them.  What do they use?  Thanks
KenFM

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Reply with quote  #2 
I recommend you purchase both as they do different jobs
Ken
Tony

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Reply with quote  #3 
I have the Ridgid two in one with both belt and spindle sanders. I don't use it all that much as most of my stuff is too small and I'd rather take my time cutting and avoid a lot of sanding, just my way of doing things.
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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #4 
I use a belt sander. I have three. Two 6x48 that mount on a Shopsmith. The other is a 42x1 Delta. I also have the Ridgid spindle sander. I also have sanding disks one six inch that is mounted on the Delta and both flat/standard and conical disks for the Shopsmith.

For toy making

The disk sanders are not that useful. You can use them for making wheels and squaring up small parts but that about it. If you don't have anything else you can make do with them.

The 6x48 belt sanders are work horses. I could put a 36 grit belt on this thing and and grid a 2x4 into powder. With the right sand paper you can take a block of wood and grind wheels out of it. I've done it. It's messy but it works great. I did it outdoors. I have also used it to rough out car bodies.  You can use this to flatten small boards or the bottom of cars you didn't cut straight. It has some curved surfaces you can use as well as the back of the belt where there is no platen. With a little practice you cans sand most curves on it. The Shopsmith belt sander also has an accessory spindle to attach a drum sander. I use this a lot. The second sander this size is a Central Machinery from Harbor Freight that also mounts on a Shopsmith. If I had the money and the space I would have three of these set up with different grits so I would not need to change belts.

The 42x1 Delta is great. Not only can you sand with this but you can sharpen/grind with it. I've used a special belt to shape plastic ferules on golf clubs. You can get all sorts of belts for it. It can sand in places you can't get to with anything else. With practice and a light touch you can sand any outside curve you want and some inside curves. It does a good job of grinding out wheels plus it has a disk sander on the side.

My experience with the Ridgid spindle sander is some what limited since I've only had it a few months. What I can tell you is that the spindles are much better than using a drum sander on the drill press. I like the oscillating belt sander a lot but it is a bit small for my. Like any tool this one requires some practice to master. I'm not there yet. It's very well thought out is great for those of us that need to move things around to get work done.

If I could only have one for toy making.

It's a tough call between the two belt sanders but I might have to go with the Delta 42x1. It really depends on what toys you are going to make. For a rocking horse the big Shopsmith sander wins no contest. Try sanding the bottom of the rockers even on a one inch wide belt. The smaller things get the better the smaller belt looks.

Why not the spindle sander? I got along without one for 30 years. It's a useful tool but it's not a magic pill it takes a good bit of practice to use the spindle and not get ripples in your wood. When it comes to doing brute force things like grinding out some wheels or sanding rockers it just doesn't cut it.

Cost is another important issue. The drums for the spindle sander are expensive by comparison and if you want something special like a 36 grit drum your not going to be able to buy it at Home Depot. The 40x6 belts are available at Harbor Freight cheap. There are better ones but these work. Because they are standard belt sizes you can get them in just about any grit you want. The 42x1 Delta also uses standard size belts and there are lots of other belts for them that are not sanding belts. Want a powered leather strop they are available. Want to grind and polish metal. There are belts for it.

One thing that I too me get through my head is that you are not going to do finish sanding on one of these machines. Your going to hand sand if you want a glass smooth finish. My favorite grit is 80 and some times I like 36 or 60 I almost never use anything finer than 80 grit.

Confused yet.     [smile]

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ed357sw

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Reply with quote  #5 
Well I'll toss in my 2 cents here as well.

I have both a oscillating spindle sander and a Harbor fright belt disk sander.


I use both. The spindle sander pretty much gets all things curvy. It came with 6 or 8 different size spindles and with different grits I can smooth out most things pretty quickly.

As for the Harbor freight sander it gets all things flat and is used to ruff out the actual toy or part as needed I have the original belt on it at this point so you can quickly take down a small board or part and then finish sanding it with a small orbital sander ( so I guess I have 3 sanders actually) LOL

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #6 
I forgot to count the hand held sanders. [biggrin]
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kenbod

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Reply with quote  #7 
Wish I had a belt/disc sander, but have no room to fit it in, I use my hand belt sander with two jigs to fit it to worktop to use as belt sander & edge sander, both shop made. Then an 8" disc sander built from plans by Izzy Swan, powered my spare drill, works good, then a small 1" belt disc sander built from plans by John Heisz.  These can be brought out as required, not as powerful as shop machines but good enough for the small parts I build. Missed a good sander now building rocking horse.

Ken

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