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gilljc

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Reply with quote  #1 
Just had my first attempt at colouring wood in the oven (as warned - its stinky!) amazing :-) just wanted to ask, who cuts and sands first, can you cook first then cut? which is best? some of my finished pieces came out with dark spots on, presumably resin bubbling out, most have sanded out, but one or two left.Gill
garywisbey

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Reply with quote  #2 
i can't realy help you to much as i have not realy tied colouring wood in a oven i was going to have a go one day and my mum saw what i was doing and was not going to have any of that oh well she have to leave the house some time haha the oven was only about 2 weeks old so i can understrand.
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john lewman

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Gill,
It's a good idea to cook and then cut and sand. Some woods will shrink a little when heat-treated so pre-cooking prevents fitting problems when gluing. The woods tint all the way through when treated so sawing and sanding does not change the color of the wood. I've had spotting with some woods also and actually left the spots in place to add character when finished. Many woods do not spot at all. I picked up a toaster oven at a garage sale for cheap. All the cooking is done outside on the porch. That's a good thing for keeping the peace!
Tony

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Reply with quote  #4 
Toaster oven outside is the way to go, my first attempt in the kitchen did not go well and the ruined wood was only a minor problem as the grief I got from my wife for the smell of burnt wood in the kitchen that last a while. She is generally real supportive of my woodworking. I have tried different woods with varying results. My chop hog was fir and was not that great as none turned really dark. I just did some pine, cherry, maple and birch, the cherry turned real dark after one and a half hours. the others were darker as well. So I still need a lot more practice.
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ohoutved

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Reply with quote  #5 

Just joined the forum today, and read all your posts about getting wood darker.

Well if you want dark (cheap) wood, then I suggest that you try oak, and then treat it with the FUMES from Ammoniumhydroxid (NH4OH). Depending of how strong solution you use, it will take between 2 - 4 hours to get a really dark brown color of the oak tree, - and you don't have to get into problems using your oven or toaster. - But I do recommend to stay in a well ventilated place as you do not want to inhale the fumes from Ammoniumhydroxid [wink]

The smell of the remaining fumes of the Ammoniumhydroxid in the wood are all gone in a few days, - until then - don't place the fumed wood together with the fresh wood or that will be dark as well. 

Udie

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Reply with quote  #6 
Sdauspanner, posted this question about tinting wood.
I had to spit his post because it addressed two (2) separate topics - Udie
Sdaupanner 
I was thinking adding a bit of salad oil to the wood being heated in the oven would that change to color or tint? would it take less or more time to get the same results as you would with out it? Using the wax and oil finish would this be a way to do two birds with one stone


kangaroopaws

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Reply with quote  #7 
I tried the pine in the oven and after leaving 1 1/2hours then  for another 1 1/2  hours we gave up and hardly changed the colour at all, seems like I have done something wrong, any ideas as to what, thought temperature was correct
robin( kangaroopaws)
john lewman

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Kangaroopaws,

I think that your oven is faulty or that your temperature is not high enough. 400 to 450 degrees fahrenheit will darken the pine wood to very dark based on the time. You might try using a cooking temperature gauge in your oven to check the temperature. I have baked a lot of pine and it always works. 1 hour will darken it to a light walnut color. 2 hours or more in the oven gives it a dark mahogany tint. Good luck!
john lewman

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Reply with quote  #9 
To answer Sdauspanner's question:
Care must be taken to choose the correct oil for applying to wood toys. Some oils turn rancid over time. Walnut oil and mineral oil work very well. Mineral oil is the same as baby oil found in drug stores or pharmacy departments. Walmart pharmacy has the lowest price for mineral oil. 

IMPORTANT: Unrefined walnut oil and mineral oil both smoke at 320 degrees. Refined walnut oil smokes at 400 degrees. Both oils can burst into flames if the wood gets too hot.

Oil finishes are best applied right after darkening the wood in the oven and while the wood is not too hot to touch. The heated wood pulls the finish into the wood and creates a perfectly even application.  Another great choice is to apply Cynthia's Paste Wax Finish after tinting. It's base is bee's wax in mineral oil.

Good luck and be careful!



Sdaupanner

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thank you for the information John I was wondering but the question was more to keep a little bit of humor in a very serious matter. Through the question as off the wall as it may have been I have received some insight into a few different ways and methods of tinting wood with out using Stain or having to use expensive woods. It to say the least was kind of a Brainstorming way to get input to many different ways to approach the same subject like a collective. So now I have not only asked a question but have been answered with several solutions and I thank the Forum Members for their input.
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #11 
Sdauspanner
I want to second Johns comment about Cynthia's Was Finish after Tinting.  It works so good.

Even when you have finished a toy and just want to wax it with Cynthia's Paste Wax, put it in the oven for a few minutes, just long enough to warm it up. (you are not trying to burn anything here).
When the wood is warmed up the heated wood pulls the finish into the wood and creates a perfectly even application, as John said.

Give it a try.  Another benefit is when finished waxing the toy you can go in and rub the wife's neck and she won't complain about your rough hands.  Experience tell me this works.

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Sdaupanner

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Reply with quote  #12 
Ken I thank you for your backing of the wax finish that Cynthia has developed a sure fire way to a real nice finish and safe for the little ones so in that case it is the best of both worlds. I have been using Butchers Wax on the things that I have turned over the years and using the lathe with it turning at a middle speed I put the wax in the palm of my hand and proceed to apply it to the object that I am turning, this is in turn rubbed or heated enough to draw the wax into the object then after a few minutes I take a rag and lower the speed to about 1/4 and rub it by holding the cloth over the back side and pulling it towards the front it gives the wood a real luster and I guess it would do the same thing that the pen makers do with the wax's they use it is kind of a nice luster. But many have pushed Butcher's Wax aside in favor of the new out of a spray can wax's.
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks Sdaupanner

I have seen a lot of pen making videos lately where the finish coat on the pen blanks is CA glue.  Gives a high shine and very durable.

Lots of great ways to finish things.

Still one of the best is Elbow Grease and a rag.

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Sdaupanner

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Reply with quote  #14 
Ken when I posted this entry in the wood cooking I was only Kidding but you here on Toymaking did me the favor of turning the tables on me and I learned a lot from all of the people that posted and will post in the future. Elbow Grease is still the the way to a great finish and it does take a long time to learn to be a master finisher.
kangaroopaws

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hi John,
I have tried the 230celsius in my oven, but will try again, the oven temperature  is ok as all my cakes turn out fine, I have no problems with my cooking at all. thanks for the reply
robin
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