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Rsorensen

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi Everyone, I would like to know if when cutting patterns that call for two of the same if I should cut  2 1/4'' pieces glued together or separate them and then sand-file to match. Thanks, Richard
cynthia lewman

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Rsorensen,

Thanks for your question and welcome to the forum!

Both methods can work well. It depends on the blade type and wood type. You'll want to use a coarser blade when cutting double thicknesses. Softer wood cuts faster than hard wood. It's recommended that you experiment on scrap woods.

Cynthia
AES

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Reply with quote  #3 
Welcome to the Forum, this is a great place for hints & tips.

I agree 100% with what Cynthia has said above. In fact if you see any of the many video on scrolling on Youtube, "stack cutting" as it's generally called, is common practice.

As Cynthia said, it depends on the wood type, and on the blade you use, but in theory anyway, if you wanted 6 quarter inch thick pieces all the same there's no reason why you can't stack cut all 6 together - don't know what machine you have but I doubt there are any machines around that cannot cut one and a half inch thickness.

A couple of "tricks" for stack cutting:

1. Join the pieces all together by using SMALL pins on the corners of the wood, in areas which are NOT on the pieces that you'll want after finishing cutting;

2. OR you can join the separate pieces all together by carefully wrapping the whole bundle with clear parcel tape (make sure the pattern you're cutting is on the top piece before you start wrapping [smile]);

3. Depending on wood type, and what the finished pieces are going to be used for, make sure the grain of each piece is running in the same direction.

Regarding sanding or filing, generally you shouldn't need more than a gentle hand sanding, IF you've chosen a the right blade for the job. Look at websites like Mike Goode for lots of helpful info on blade choice.

Just as Cynthia said, this depends on the wood, but basically, the finer the blade (i.e. the lower the number), the slower the cut will be, BUT the smoother the cut edges will be.

It takes a while and a bit of experimentation to find what suits you, your pattern, and your wood, but after quite a bit of messing around trying various blades and sizes, I find that now I rarely need to do more than a swift run around the cut edges by hand with a 180 or 240 grit paper.

A ladies abrasive nail file/emery board is also useful for getting into tight corners, etc. And if you've got really small internal corners, etc, (like the window cut outs on a small toy car for example) then a metal workers needle file is very useful.

HTH

Enjoy yourself.

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AES

Rsorensen

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi, Cynthia & AES Thank you for the info. I have a old 20''Jet scroll saw. My main wood will be African Mahogany also Red Grandis and Walnut. I have see videos on resawing do you think that would work?                                                                                                                                                       Thanks Again, Richard                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  



AES

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi, I'm NO expert, but I think (only think mind) that re-sawing is mainly done on a band saw. The problem with trying that on any scroll saw would be the relative narrow pieces of wood that would fit under any scroll saw - my own Excalibur 21 for example (which is a pretty big machine) would I think (without checking) only allow you to re-saw a plank just a little over 2 inches wide, whereas my small table top band saw will easily re-saw a plank of at least 6 inches wide.

Also, Mahogany is pretty hard wood, and so is Walnut. I've never heard of Red Grandis, sorry (as I say, I'm not an expert).

What is the maximum thickness your scroll saw will take? If it's 2 inches or more, you could try re-sawing such a piece of that wood at 2 inches or so width, but in that case I guess you'd need a pretty coarse (high number) blade, ideally a skip type blade (to clear all the saw dust cleanly), and also at a guess, the "finished" re-sawn cut faces would also need some pretty thorough sanding after re-sawing.

If you already have such wood and it's too thick for what you need for scrolling, why not see if a local saw mill or joinery shop would do a re-sawing job for you on their band saw (I'm assuming you don't have a band saw of your own)?

More than that I don't know, sorry.

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Rsorensen

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi AES, I have a friend that has a band saw that could re-saw and like you said it would need a good sanding. Red Grandis is a type Eucalyptus.Just found it at local hardwood store.   Thanks Again.                             
PaPa Jack

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rsorensen
Hi Everyone, I would like to know if when cutting patterns that call for two of the same if I should cut  2 1/4'' pieces glued together or separate them and then sand-file to match. Thanks, Richard
PaPa Jack

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Reply with quote  #8 
I cut one, trace 1st one on to 2nd piece to be cut , glue together then sand to exact.
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