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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #1 
Drill all your holes before you do anything else, especially when drilling wood that is prone to tear out.

When cutting window openings, start with a new/sharp blade in your scroll saw and always begin the cut in a spot that is easy to sand never in a corner.

When you are cutting out the body or part of the toy with your scroll saw, always study the shape and start the cut at a location that is easy to sand.

Don't cut from the edge of the board. Drill a hole near where you want to make the cut and insert the blade as you would with an internal cut.

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Peter V

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Reply with quote  #2 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadBob
Drill all your holes before you do anything else, especially when drilling wood that is prone to tear out.

When cutting window openings, start with a new/sharp blade in your scroll saw and always begin the cut in a spot that is easy to sand never in a corner.

When you are cutting out the body or part of the toy with your scroll saw, always study the shape and start the cut at a location that is easy to sand.

Don't cut from the edge of the board. Drill a hole near where you want to make the cut and insert the blade as you would with an internal cut.


THANKS A LOT!!!!

Tips:

1. known

2. new >> very good tip and ´welcomed´ or much appreciated

3. New >> very good tip and ´welcomed´ or much appreciated

4. New >> did not know that but alsways ran into difficulties. I say ´ran´, because thanks to present your tip, I will not make this mistake again.

Bob, 

a ´stupid´question, are there tips about drilling axle holes with multiple axles?

Even when I pair axle/wheels - conform your tip/advise which I took over - I ALWAYS  have to re-do one of the axle holes due to mis-alignment.

Even when I measure it at 0,1 mm it ALWAYS happens that - with a truck wit 2 axles at the back, one in front, one of those two is 0,5 or less mm above the floor/road/carpet or whatever.

I have a Bosch with laser-guide for drilling holes and measure with a calliper.


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Peter V
Missouri Wayne

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Re: Holes not same distance from edge.
Make sure that the table of the drill press is locked down and clamp a board onto the table that will give you the spacing from the axle hole to the bottom of the vehicle.  This should allow every hole to be the same distance from the edge. 
Always make sure there is not debris between the body and the board. Make sure there is not debris between the body and the table.
Make sure the bottom of the vehicle is square to the sides or you can have problems. 
If you have wood with heavy grain in it the drill bit may wander when you come down.  Have not found a solution to that problem. 
Wombat

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Reply with quote  #4 
Great advice Missouri Wayne.

 Might I add to clamp the toy to the square edge to prevent slight movement?
Aside from safe practice, our hand-grip is not what it used to be.
 Also I have found Brad point drill bits do not wander as much as regular twist drills in heavily grained wood, especially with low feed rates.

Peter V, sounds like your drill is similar to mine, it should have come with an angle-bar to clamp to the table for use as a straight edge.

Notwithstanding all of the above, in the bad old days before I got my new drill press, I have been known to drill the leading axle of the bogie-set one drill size larger. The front and rear-most wheels position the truck on the ground, the centre wheels have more freedom to follow the terrain between.
Missouri Wayne

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Reply with quote  #5 
Brad point drills certainly help but I still find they will "wander" depending on how they hit the grain.  Using an awl to put a starting point in the wood doesn't seem to always help.

We should always clamp pieces down when drilling.  Makes good sense.  Generally don't do it because i get lazy.  

Like the idea of letting the middle set of wheels "float" a little. Wlil do that in the future.
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #6 
Is your drill bit square to the table?

With the pattern aligned with the bottom of your pattern parallel to the edge of the board. Use a fence on the drill press to assure the holes get drilled equally spaced from the bottom. I have bookcases that I built with adjustable shelving that are seven feet tall and have 1/4-inch holes for shelf pins. Hundreds of holes drilled using this method. I didn't mess up one hole.

Do you have the drill speed properly set. Smaller bits need higher speeds. If the bit is turning to slow for its size it will be more likely to wander.

Sharp drill bits help a lot with wandering.

I have just about stopped using an awl to mark drilling points. Awls will go sideways if they hit hard grain. I drill pilot holes with a 1/16-inch bit all the way through if I'm using 3/4-inch thick stock.

Is your wood flat? If it isn't your hols are not going to be square to the bottom. There is some wiggle room when you are using a dowel but nearly zero when you are using pegs.







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Peter V

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Reply with quote  #7 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Wayne
 (....)
Make sure that the table of the drill press is locked down and clamp a board onto the table that will give you the spacing from the axle hole to the bottom of the vehicle.  This should allow every hole to be the same distance from the edge. 

(.....) 



Missouri Wayne,

I don´t understand (picture  me exactly) what you mean by: (....) clamp a board onto the table that will give you the spacing from the axle hole to the bottom of the vehicle.

pse foto?

thanks in advance

 


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Peter V
Wombat

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Reply with quote  #8 
Peter V,
 I am getting a vibe here that you use a hand-held pistol drill  and not a bench-mounted pedestal drill.

 Please confirm.
 If you are using a hand held drill, angle and positional accuracy will always be less than perfect.

The technique Missouri wayne and I refer to applies only to a pedestal drill.
With a pedestal drill, the drill bit will always be square to the table, and you position the work under the drill, instead of moving the hand drill from place to place.
In the picture below, I use a metal bar instead of a piece of wood, set exactly the distance I want from the edge of the timber to the position of the axle hole. When the first hole is drilled, I unclamp the workpiece , slide it along until the next hole is lined up with the drill, drill that one and repeat for the third hole. ALL will be exactly in a line.
You Cannot do that with a hand held drill.

874C3CE8-7E1C-4B01-A0F6-428CC9F3FA25.jpeg

Peter V

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Reply with quote  #9 

Wombat,


this one I have. Your first feeling about us having the same drill iwas correct.

 

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PaPa Jack

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Wayne
Re: Holes not same distance from edge.
Make sure that the table of the drill press is locked down and clamp a board onto the table that will give you the spacing from the axle hole to the bottom of the vehicle.  This should allow every hole to be the same distance from the edge. 
Always make sure there is not debris between the body and the board. Make sure there is not debris between the body and the table.
Make sure the bottom of the vehicle is square to the sides or you can have problems. 
If you have wood with heavy grain in it the drill bit may wander when you come down.  Have not found a solution to that problem. 


Can't believe it but I knew someone would invent one sooner or later.  On facebook there is a ad for a hole saw that makes a SQUARE HOLE  pretty ingenious.  Uses a brad bid in the center of a 4 sided chisel point.  As you drill the hole the 4 sided chisel cute the remaining sides !!!!
Wombat

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Reply with quote  #11 
By the sound of it, you have just stumbled across the ubiquitous Mortise Bit, a drill inside of a square chisel.  Been around for a hundred years and used by carpenters and cabinet makers for creating mortise and tenon joints.

Loggerlaws

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hi all,
       I also have a Bosch drill press mounted up near eve level, mostly used for drilling axle holes and I put a 6mm drum sander sleeve glued on to a 6mm rod or an old 6mm drill bit to sand my toy parts. Saved buying a bobbin sander. Sorry can't seam to turn photo 90 degrees.
20200510_131918[1].jpg 
Cheers Raymond

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