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kstano83

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I got some maple wood that had black areas that looked like mold. Maybe. I though that will go away after planing completely but apparently it did not. Can anyone tell me what it is from the pictures attached? Is it ok to use as it is, or should I just  avoid just the darker bits?

IMG_20180506_182717.jpg  IMG_20180506_182726.jpg  IMG_20180506_182735.jpg

Rod T

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I am no expert, but is this called Spalting?
I don't know if the affected area is more toxic than timber without it, but spalted timber is highly prized for it's different colours decorative effect etc. 

I'm not much help here, does someone else have any idea?

Cheers
Rod T

harry

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Definitely salting, as for toxicity, I am unsure.The spalted areas should be softer than the rest of the wood
Butch504

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I worked in a lumber mill and a logyard. We called this blue stain. Mostly from being out in he weather. It should not hurt anything. Hope this helps.
Cometoz

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Definitely "Spalting" - it polishes up nicely and creates a nice feature.

BadBob

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Reply with quote  #6 

Some handy tips for making, handling, and machining spalted wood:

  1. Protect: I can’t over state this.  You must wear a dust mask and use an air filter.  Why take chances?
  2. Keep it sealed: While spalting in your bathroom works well, make sure the wood is in a plastic tub or plastic bag that is sealed.  It shouldn’t be air tight, but it should restrict air flow.  The less air flow you have, the fewer spores are being circulated.  Also, sealed containers will help cut down on that rotting wood smell.
  3. Double up: on protection when sanding spalted wood.  That dust isn’t just wood, its also fungi.  Make sure you are wearing goggles when you are reducing spalted wood into particulate.  I wear goggles when sanding even clear wood, because I’m not a big fan of wood in my eyes.
  4. Don’t panic!: I realize that the prospect of mold in the lungs isn’t pretty, but the world is full of professional mycologists who have been working with fungi for years, and are perfectly healthy.  However I’ve heard about several woodworkers who, after 20 or so years in the shop (and working with spalted wood), have horrible lung and eye problems.  My first question is always did they wear a mask?, quickly followed by how often did they wear their mask?  So before someone goes blaming fungi for respiratory problems, I always suggest that they take a quick look at how much wood they’ve inhaled along with those spores.

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kstano83

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BadBob, as far as the number 2. goes - Keep it sealed: will the Cynthia´s bee was paste do enough as protection? Is such a toy ok for a kid lets say 3 years +?
BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kstano83
BadBob, as far as the number 2. goes - Keep it sealed: will the Cynthia´s bee was paste do enough as protection? Is such a toy ok for a kid lets say 3 years +?


Short answer: No. It is a non-curing, nonfilm forming,  and nonsealing finish.  It looks nice, is easy to apply and makes the grain pop but it does not seal the wood. I would not use it for spalted wood.

I would use polyurethane or shellac.  Probably shellac at least for the first coat. Shellac is renowned for its ability to seal almost anything.
 
Lacquer should be ok.  Any film-forming finish should seal it up just fine.
 
Nonfilm forming finishes may work as long as the cure hard.
 
Mineral oil never cures and doesn't seal the wood. I would not use any mineral oil based finish on spalted wood. 
 
There are oil finishes that cure, such as boiled linseed oil or tung oil. However, they all have long cure times. In some cases, four to six weeks depending on conditions and toxic until cured. A few of these are fire hazards. Linseed oil on a rag can spontaneously combust.

If you want to learn about finishes read everything you can find by Bob Flexner.
 
 
 
 

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