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kstano83

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I'm new to the whole toy making and scroll sawing and instead of buying a scroll saw, I would like to make myself one. Well, if that would work. Would it? Like this...





Daniel L Abbink

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Reply with quote  #2 
Check out UTUBE  or pintrest I saw a home scroll somewhere good luck.


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BadBob

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Sure you can make one. It's not cost effective unless you happen to have all the stuff you need just laying around. A suitable motor will cost $75 or more. That alone is more than many of the low end saws sell for. Good quality plywood isn't cheap you could spend another $75 for that. The bits and pieces of hardware might cost you another $50. When you finished you might have a saw that was on par with one you could buy used for $50. Remember that time is money. I figure labor cost for me would be at least $250. 

Where I live there are scroll saws for sale for $50 on a regular basis. On a not so regular basis there are better quality ones. A few years ago I bought an RBI Hawk for $100 it needed a bit of help to get it going but the total cost was about $150 for a quality older saw. I can see where building your own might cost more that this and surely not cut as well. 

Weigh all your options carefully is all I'm saying.

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kstano83

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Reply with quote  #4 
OK, I see I did not express myself properly. As a motor, I could use a power drill or a jig saw. As I constantly build stuff, I have plenty of scrap wood that I could use so my extra expenses would probably be in some screws and a spring. What I was more curious about was whether such a diy scroll saw can handle making wooden toys easily. 
BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kstano83
OK, I see I did not express myself properly. As a motor, I could use a power drill or a jig saw. As I constantly build stuff, I have plenty of scrap wood that I could use so my extra expenses would probably be in some screws and a spring. What I was more curious about was whether such a diy scroll saw can handle making wooden toys easily. 


I guess that is going to depend on you personal definition of handle. I my opinion even a cheap saw will work much better than what you are talking about. 

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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #6 
Good on you for having a go at making your own. 
I had a look at the videos. The guy in the videos has obviously made quite a few different tools. I particularly like his overhead router.
I am not sure that the scroll saw he has designed will work too well. I don't particularly like the way the spring mechanism works. 
When the saw is running the blade will have the least tension when the arm is at its highest point and the most tension at it's lowest point. This will be ok for cutting thin pieces, but a lot of the toys call for 3/4 inch up to 1.5 inch thick timber.
The blade needs a lot of tension when cutting thick stock.
I think you would get frustrated pretty quickly.
If there is a way to make 2 parallel arms that can hold the blade then this would eliminate this problem. He used a jigsaw for the up and down motion, you may need to use a drill with a cam on the end, rigged up to the arms to create the up and down motion.

Scroll saw blades get dull very quickly compared to other saw blades, so you might want to think about an easy way to change blades as well.

Just some thoughts.

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Rod T
kstano83

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks Rod T. It makes sense to me. I searched a bit more and found one with two parallel arms. Would this one be better? 

AES

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With the greatest of respect to previous posters, I think some of the comments above are a little too negative. It seems to me that there are 2 reasons to build your own scroll saw (or any other power tool come to that).

1st reason is that for whatever reason you cannot afford shop-bought, and in that respect this depends not only on your own personal circumstances but also where you are located! For example, if I lived in (off the top of my head) Kathmandu in Nepal, I bet I couldn't buy a scroll saw - ANY scroll saw, however basic - for only 50 bucks! On the other hand, how much good ply, suitable bearings, nuts and bolts, how many spare jigsaws or drills do you have on hand? Because again using the example, if your answer is "not a lot" then I bet such things are neither cheap nor easily available in Kathmandu!

2nd reason is that you just like building your own tools, just for the pleasure of doing that. It is clear that the makers of both videos (I watched them all) fall into that category.

And there's nothing at all wrong with that, but you also have to ask yourself "What do I really want to do, build toys, or build tools?" In other words, the time you'll need to build a SUCCESSFUL scroll saw will be considerable, and within that same time scale you could have built a LOT of toys instead! Not only that, to build a successful scroll saw you'll definitely need a quite well-equipped workshop. Just one example - you'll need to be able to drill holes of many different diameters, all exactly vertical - in other words, you need a pillar drill plus an assortment of drills, spade bits, hole saws, augers, etc, etc.

So it's up to you to consider all the aspects, and as I hope you realise for the above examples, there are more points to consider than you may at first think.

But looking all 4 videos, if you do decide to build and not buy, if I were you I would build the last saw you showed. It has a parallel arm system (always better, IF you can build it accurately!) and although I haven't built any of his plans myself, Izzy Swann, the producer of the last video, is well known for producing pretty good designs.

If you do decide to build, good luck and let's see some pix when it's finished please.

HTH

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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #9 
Yeh, that one that Izzy Swann made is much better. 

You can always upgrade it later with a dedicated motor if you wanted to. 

Would love to see how you go with this.

I am sure it will be very rewarding making your own scroll saw and then using it to make some toys. 

I am going to have a look at what else he has made. I would love a drum sander like the sandflee ones, but can't justify $1500 for one. 

Cheers
Rod T
kstano83

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AES
With the greatest of respect to previous posters, I think some of the comments above are a little too negative.


I thought so too, but did not really want to bring it up. I have been thinking about it though and I'm now leaning more towards buying one. There are no used available in my country so it must be new. The budget is my issue though. I want to spend as little as possible, but not to get a crappy one. I'm not really sure what features I should be looking for. I guess I want variable speed and quick and easy blade swapping/detaching. Anything else?
This is what the German amazon has to offer:  https://goo.gl/65G7Y9
Rod T

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My apologies if my comments sounded negative. 
Certainly not intended.

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Rod T

BadBob

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Reply with quote  #12 
What is important to me is how quick I can change the blade.

I cut a lot of very nice pieces on a cast iron saw that was made in Taiwan and originally used pin end blades until I modified it to use the pinless ones. That saw would cut so smooth the wood was shiny.  You don't want to use pin end blades it limits the type and size of blades you can use.



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AES

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Reply with quote  #13 
All the saws that you show in your link to Amazon will work, BUT:

1. The ProxXon saws shown are in a different category - they are excellent by reputation (I don't have one, but have other Proxxon tools, all excellent, but quite pricey - "you get what you pay for"), but all Proxxon tools, including their saws are at the small to very small end of the market. I've seen several Proxxon scroll saws, look great but their ultimate capacity (cutting depth) is about half all the others shown. Unless you want to make only quite small toys, you will be disappointed - at a guess, the Proxxons will only manage about half the plans on this site - certainly not the bigger trucks, etc;

2. The Hegner is a whole different ball game - although some will argue I'm sure, Hegner is generally reckoned to be one of the best saws available (although personally I like my own Excalibur better). The one problem is that Hegner is VERY expensive (some people say that both their saws and their spare parts are vastly over-priced). But if you can afford Hegner you won't be disappointed, it will do all you will ever want it to do, AND it will last forever;

3. All the rest shown are actually more or less the exact same saw, probably made in the same factory in China, and are actually only "different" because of the badge, the colour, and some minor detail items. BUT, some of the "manufacturers" have better Quality Control than others. For example I had an Einhell before I got my present Excalibur (mine was not the model shown, but a previous model), and frankly it was "rubbish". The arms were warped and being castings could not be bent straight enough to be able to cut truly vertical - the blade waggled from side to side. But quite honestly, I doubt that any of the other saws shown are better, although Sheppach does have a reputation for a better QC.

The big advantage you have with buying new is that if it's no good, you can send the saw back and get your money back or a replacement, and Amazon are known to be very good for this.

You don't say where you are, but if you're anywhere near Germany, you should visit Dictum Tools in Munich. When I went there I had the chance to actually try both a Hegner and an Excalibur alongside each other.

But in short, YES, pinless blades/quick change blades are important, so is variable speed. In the end ANY saw which has those features (cast iron table is nice but not vital) will do the job, and if you are buying new from a reputable supplier, if you are unlucky enough to get a bad one like my Einhell, the supplier will change it.

Good luck and sorry for the long post.     


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kstano83

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Reply with quote  #14 
To Rod T - Not at all, no worries.

To BadBob - I don't know why but until now I thought that pin end or pinless refers to the way teeth are positioned. Now I get it, thanks!

To AES - Thank you for the long post. I'm from Slovakia. I checked Henger but their prices are way too high for me. Maybe one day [smile]. I chose Amazon because of free shipping but if brand really matters in scroll saws, I can get Proxxon in my country as well. I thought of spending up to 150€, but I can get PROXXON DSH 28092 for about 175€, that seems quite fine. 

What do you guys think?
AES

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Reply with quote  #15 
Well, as I said in my last post, Proxxon's are very good I hear, but they're also SMALL - both the thickness of wood you can cut, and the throat size (size of the piece you're cutting).

If you look at the specifications on that Amazon page you linked to (click on each picture for "more information") and look at throat size you'll see the Proxxons are all about half of all the other machines. Likewise, all the other saws shown will cut wood up to roughly 1.5 inches or more thick (say 125-150mm) whereas all the Proxxon saws I've seen will only cut about 1 inch thick wood (100mm) max, some models cut even less.

Also as I said in the last post, the above is fine if you only want to make smaller toys, but if you look at some of the plans on here you'll see that things like the big trucks, etc, often need wood thicker than that. Of course you COULD cut thinner wood in two pieces and glue & clamp them together afterwards to bring them up to the right thickness, but that's adding a lot of extra work unnecessarily.

HTH

AES

Edit for P.S. This Forum is excellent for information on toy building, has excellent hints and tips on making toys, and a lot of brilliant plans. Plus lots of pix of finished toys to inspire you!!!!

But if you want more in-depth information on choosing a scroll saw, another Forum I belong to has much more detailed information on scrolling and scroll saws.

I suggest you join - ukworkshop.co.uk - (it's free) where amongst a lot of other sections, you'll find a separate Scroll Saw section. Go through that section and you'll see a lot of information on the why's and wherefore's of choosing a scroll saw. All due respect to this Forum, but as you've seen, the vast majority of members here are in the USA, whereas UKW is much more UK and Europe-orientated. That's where I got a lot of valuable information when I first started this hobby - just one example - a lot of people here recommend the Delta scroll saw and I believe it's very good indeed. But unfortunately, as I learnt on UKW, the Delta saws are virtually unobtainable in Europe these days.

AES

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