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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #16 
A lot of the toys I make are 1.5 inches thick. I've tried it both ways. Cutting 1.5 inch thick stock and cutting 3/4 inch and gluing them up afterwards. The problem is that when you cut and glue them they never exactly match you need to do a lot of sanding. This is a lot of additional work. Even if you have power sanding equipment.  Unless you are going to stick to small toys a saw that will not cut 1.5 inch stock is limited.

The there is pad/stack sawing wher you cut multiple pieces at once. I cut these two or three at a time. Depending on how thick they are.

20170828-181313 - Halloween Cut Outs - Shop - Work Bench.jpg 
This is a good way to get duplicate parts the same. Left and right fenders on a truck or car for example. Or cut wheels four at a time and sand them while they are still together and you have four identical wheels.


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AES

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Reply with quote  #17 
kstano83:

I agree 100% with what BadBob has posted above. And if you look not only at his picture above, but also at a lot of his other posts on this Forum you'll see that not only is he a prolific toy maker, but he also "knows his onions" (as we say in English - meaning he's pretty much an experienced expert)!

In short, the Proxxon machines are excellent but I think too limited for toy making because of their small size. As BadBob says, not only do you often need to cut thicker wood for some toys, but just as he also says, "stack cutting" of several parts at once is a great way to speed up the process AND automatically increase the accuracy of each part.

HTH

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kstano83

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Reply with quote  #18 
I think I totally get your point, but as I checked, most scroll saws, including the above mentioned Proxxon are 50mm/2''. I only found two that are 57mm, which is 2-1/4''but those were for pinned blades. Or am I missing anything?
AES

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Reply with quote  #19 
OK, I wasn't able to check the Proxxon model number you quoted, but if it has 2" cut, then that's fine - all the Proxxon saws I've seen or heard of are MUCH smaller than that.

What is the throat measurement of the Proxxon model you quoted? You need AT LEAST 12 inches (more is better, most have about 16 inches or more). Just in case you don't know it, the throat measurement is the distance between the blade and the inside of the rear frame when you are cutting the work piece and pushing it straight back from the blade until the work piece hits the frame. I hope that's clear.

If that Proxxon has multi (or at least several fixed step) speeds, + quick blade change (preferably without needing any tool), +if it will take both pinned and pinless blades of 5 inches length (not the much shorter blades as you see on some other saws like Dremel and a few others), then I would guess you'll have a saw that will do everything you want.

Compared with Swiss prices (where I am) $175 sounds pretty good to me for Proxxon. As said before, Proxxon tools generally do have a very good reputation.

Best of luck.

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kstano83

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Reply with quote  #20 
The throat length is 16'', has two fixed speeds 900/1400 rpm, 2'' depth, but I'm not sure about the blade length. Here it is: https://www.proxxon.com/en/micromot/28092.php?search
Rod T

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Reply with quote  #21 
I agree with what Badbob and AES have said, not sure that I can add much more. 

I haven't seen the Proxxon one here in Australia, but it appears to have all the features that you will need. I had a look at the link that you posted, the saw takes 5" blades, so you have a vast choice of blades.
It is not really clear in the picture how the pinless blades are secured. This may be something worth investigating further. I started with a second hand Makita that was the same as the generic ones on the Amazon link that you showed us.
Although it was a good start and it performed well, I soon got frustrated with the clamping mechanism for pinless blades.  

Cheers
Rod T

kstano83

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Reply with quote  #22 
Here is a video showing how the blades attach. It starts at 7:30



Edit:
I found a scroll saw that is very similar in features to the Proxxon except it has variable speed.  It is SCHEPPACH SD 1600 V https://goo.gl/YWvhK1  The reviews make me hesitant, but it costs half the price of the Proxxon. 
Bucko

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Reply with quote  #23 
Experience tells me that if your hesitant don't buy it as you won't have confidence in the saw.
kstano83

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Reply with quote  #24 
I found this used Hegner scroll saw but it just wont deliver to my country. 
Nevermind, it's gone...
kstano83

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Reply with quote  #25 
I just pulled the trigger on Proxxon DS 460 from amazon with several packs of different blades. https://goo.gl/oy5AkG I should have it in 3 weeks. I cant wait to start...
kstano83

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Reply with quote  #26 
I got the saw today but I must say I'm a bit disapointed. It runs very smooth and quiet, but changing the blade, or reattachig it back for inner cuts is a hassle. I need ot loosen the tentioning knob at the back, then the one above the blade and remove the clamp very time. If I just loosen the top clamp the blade falls down off the bottom holder. The clamps even have a round hole inside that I need to insert the blade into from the bottom to have it held well....I tried to work on it for a while to see if I did something wrong but it was still the same and I got annoyed with it.

Is it how most scroll saws work or did I just overlooked soomething when choosing one? I have seen several saws that have a quick release above the blade or at the back of the throat and I find it way more convenient but that would limit my options to only two saws I can buy here.

BadBob

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Reply with quote  #27 
No they don't all work like that although I think most of the cheaper ones do. 

This is why I like the Excalibur saws. 

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AES

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Reply with quote  #28 
+1 for BadBob's comment.

It does sound a bit of a hassle on your saw, and as BB says, a lot of saws are like that.

The only thing I can suggest is a pair of Quick Release blade clamps. These fit on a lot of different saws - but NOT all please note. The ones I know about are available from a company called Axminster Tools in UK. Here's the link:

http://www.axminster.co.uk

They do mail order and they also have a very helpful customer service which you can either call or visit on line, so you could check if their QR blade clamps are suitable for your saw. Perhaps other companies sell them too, but if so, I don't know who.

The blade clamps are not expensive and Axminster are a good reliable company to deal with.

I have no connection with Axminster apart from being a satisfied customer.

HTH


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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #29 
This is why I bought the Excalibur.
A lot more coin than the others, but a high quality machine and it has this blade changing feature.
To the best of my knowledge I am only aware of 2 others that are like this. The Dewalt and the new JET saws. Both of which are not available here in Oz, so that made my decision to get the Excalibur a no brainer. Haven't regretted it yet. 

A side question regarding the Excalibur. Where do you guys have the motor adjusted to?
If you rotate the motor one way it creates more of a pendulum effect on the blade when cutting.
Rotate the other way and this pendulum effect is less.
By pendulum effect I mean the blade moving back and forth as it is going up and down. 
The guys with Excalibur saws should know what I am talking about.

Cheers
Rod T
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #30 
I don't thing I have ever chage the motor position. I've been mostly happy with it the way it was when I got it. This could be because I don't know any better. I learned to cut with an AMT that had only one speed and one adjustment for blade tension. I also run at the highest speed all the time. I tried slowing it down and didn't like it.

I'm guessing moving the motor changes how aggressive the cut is.

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