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Pobble

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Reply with quote  #1 
Looking at the videos of the say the Mercedes lorry truck I would like to ask how the end grain is finished, as it looks perfect and matches the rest of the wood.
A good example is the slant of the roof of the cab at the front.
Pine in the uk can have a fairly coarse end grain, which would spoil the finish.
Thanks
Brian
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #2 
Pobble
I use two different ways.

1.  when priming I will coat and sand until end grain is filled in.  Usually the 1st coat of primer is thinned if I am applying with a brush.  With the primer thinned it will make the grain pop out and dries in a hurry.
Then after sanding I will put on a thicker coat, and sand again, if happy, depending on how good you want the toy to look, I will go to painting.  If not happy with the look apply another coat of primer, then paint.

2.  I like to have a tube of auto paint filler.  Here it is red and creamy and goes on really easy. It will fill the end grain pores, and dries really fast.  Then sand it off and proceed to priming.

Just two ideas, and I am sure other here might have a better way.

Good Luck


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Pobble

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Ken
If you are going to paint the toy, end grain is not such a problem.
I was thinking about the finish when, for example, you use Cynthia's beeswax and mineral oil.
What primer do you use?
Brian
Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #4 
Ken: we used that and called it glazing putty (not to be confused with the window glass stuff)...it is really fine/smooth that's why it is used after the vehicle is primed to fill in any sanding marks in the body filler....I forgot about that stuff, I'll have to pick up a tube...way better than wood filler if you're painting....
Udie

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Reply with quote  #5 
Brian (Pobble) - End grain on toys is no different than preparing end grain in fine furniture prior to finishing. I am guessing you might be interested in not painting but keeping the natural wood look.
The trick I use is sanding. Start with 150 and work your way up to 400 or even higher. By using higher grit sandpapers closes the grain for an even soak.
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #6 
Pobble

I use Krylon spray white primer when I want to spray paint, and Krylon gray primer when brushing the primer on.
I am working on two toy puzzle trucks that I am making out of Redwood.  These were cut from a 2x8" so I needed a bigger blade to scroll saw them with.  Anyway I got lots of end grain tear out.
One of these toys I am doing with Krylon spray primer, and the other with Krylon gray brush on primer.
Will let you know tomorrow how they worked out.

Note:  Redwood is not the best for toys because it is so soft, but it is very light when having to ship toys.  The weight really makes a difference.

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Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #7 
No fooling about the shipping/weight issue. I looked up to see what it would cost to ship my batmobiles and Canada Post was $9.95 and FedEx/Purolator/UPS were $50 and UP!!
The thing is only 3" x 6" x 3" high and weighs about 4 ounces.....
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #8 
Muskokamike
It seems nuts what they what for shipping sometimes.
I was lucky when I sent the 30 little planes to Sweden, it only cost $65.00, and the client agreed to pay the shipping.  Good thing to otherwise that order would not have gotten off the ground.

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KenFM

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Reply with quote  #9 
Pobble
I have great success using artist GESSO which is a water based acrylic sealer used to seal canvas. I give my end grain a coat of primer / lacquer first then after sanding with 320 grit then by brush a coat or two of GESSO sanding  before painting possible 2 or 3 coats before final lacquer.

Flintshire-20140512-00136.jpg 
I cut these 1 from MDF and 1 from Pine filled end grain both with GESSO and both look the same

gesso 002.JPG 

gesso 001.JPG 
Brush applied GESSO before sanding on MDF
I will post you a picture of the completed Pig money box so you can see how good the GESSO is
For £4.99 this tub will last a very long time

KenFM

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Reply with quote  #10 
Pobble
Where in the UK are you based? I am in North Wales
Ken
Udie

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Reply with quote  #11 
Pobble (Brian) - Nice job on the trucks and the finish looks top knotch.
I zoomed in on your photo and it looks to me your tires have a tread pattern to them.
Did you make the wheels?
Here we can purchase Gesso thick, thin, white and clear. Easy to sand and takes paint with no problems at all.
Are you adding bee's wax to your finished pieces?
KenFM

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Reply with quote  #12 
Udie
The post was by me Ken (kenFM)  The pictures were taken last year but I thought they would help Brian. I did make the wheels myself just cut using a hole saw. I did not finish these with wax just lacquer.
Ken (kenFM)

Thanks Ken and my apologies to you - I just got excited when I read the post -Udie.
Pobble

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Reply with quote  #13 

Thanks all for the helpful replies.
KenFM - I am just outside SE London.Definately can't take credit for KenFM's lovely lorries. I am still struggling with the windows on the simple cars.
Got them cut out, but struggling with the sanding.
Brian

Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #14 
Pobble
If you are cutting out the windows with a scroll saw, and using regular blades, be sure to keep the waist side of the cut on the right side of the blade, and the keeper side (or the body of the car in this case) on the left side of the blade.  On stamped blades the left side cuts better than the right side because the right side has the burrs from the stamping process.  That is the reason stamped blades will drift off line more than the others.
Having the keeper side on the left side of the blade will help make a smoother cut, which will create less sanding in the inside of the window.

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