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Wooddawg

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have a wood model of a three wheeled motorcycle. It is about a foot long. It was damaged in shipping, was replaced and I was allowed to keep the damaged item. (This was quite a few years ago when I could ride.)

Reason for the above info is that my grandson found the damaged trike and has expressed an interest in him and I repairing the damage and putting this trike back on the road to glory. Me being a newbie and him only 8 years old and sight impaired, what do I do?

The front forks are not attached, were not damaged in the shipping except becoming detached. I believe a small wooden dowel will repair this issue. Drilling required, do not believe this an issue.

The issue: How do you teach a sight impaired 8 year old about wood working? He wants to learn and I believe is capable. I do not want to say no, we have raised him to believe he can do anything.

Thanks, Wooddawg.
Peter B

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Reply with quote  #2 
Wooddawg,
Safety is probably the first step, whether it be hearing protection, dust protection and tool use.
Then small steps
From a grandfather point of view, what do your see as his impairment?
I have seen young boys with impairments handle tools more safely and more capable than able bodies.
It will be a fantastic opportunity to work with your grandson
Greg

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http://embraceofaging.com/Dying/2013-10-14.html

this is one of several blind carpenters Mr. Google showed me.
Don't let the impairment slow him down go slowly with him and teach him to be safe.
I think its fantastic he wants to do this
Peter B

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Greg, i even felt the urge to view that site and found it to very empowering and still he has all his fingers.
Only goes to show that if you really what to do something you will find a way to do it
Bucko

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Reply with quote  #5 
I'm guessing at this answer as I have no actual experience to back it up, but it seems his desire to learn and he's already been learning to cope with the vision that a hands on going step by step talking out each step of the repair will really make him happy with the project and come out of it wanting more.
Wooddawg

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Greg,
Thank you so much for the info on Mr. Wurtzel, the blind carpenter. This insight has lit a fire under me. My grandson's dad is a contractor and this opens a new world to us. THANK YOU so much.
Wooddawg
George

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Reply with quote  #7 
The American Woodturner Magazine once featured blind wood turner.  So yes if he wants to, that would be a great bonding experience.  Good luck , and keep posting.

toys without batteries

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George Meche
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