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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi Everyone

Making toys is always a lot of fun and I am always on the lookout for tips and tricks to make things easier or quicker. 
Glueing fenders on a lot of the toys can be time consuming and frustrating sometimes, as most of the time they are lined up into the correct position by eye. 
I came up with this simple solution over the weekend and thought I would share it. 
I am sure others out there already do this.

I made some templates of each of the cars and the fenders out of 3mm MDF.
I use these to trace around with a pencil onto the timber. 
Then I made a template for glueing the fenders on. 
This is basically one of the patterns with the fenders cut out and the holes drilled for the axles.
The Fat Fendered Fords all use the same fenders and the spacing between the front and back wheels is the same, so I can use the same template for all of them. 

When Glueing the fenders on, I place this template over the body and stick an axle peg in each of the axle holes. This lines up where the fenders are to go. 
I then glue in the fenders using wood glue and a bit of super glue to stop the fenders slipping while I remove the template, flip the body over and do the same on the other side. 
When all 4 fenders are on, I clamp as per usual and let dry. 
Amazing how something so simple turned a 20 minute frustration into a 5 minute piece of cake. Great for batching out multiples.

Here are my templates.

IMG_1594.JPG 

Aligning the glueing template with the axle pegs.

IMG_1595.JPG


Glue the fenders on.
  IMG_1596.JPG 

Remove the template. Flip it over and repeat on the other side.

IMG_1597.JPG 

All done.

IMG_1598.JPG 

Cheers
Rod T





john lewman

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Reply with quote  #2 
Now this is really cool stuff Rod T. What a great idea and photo story to go with it. Thanks for sharing your trade secrets.
Tony

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for the tip Rod T
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dmjones

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks sooo much for this tip! I make a lot of these cars and you can bet I am going to use this trick next time I make them. Again thanks for this GREAT tip.

David
AES

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Reply with quote  #5 
That's a great idea, thanks for posting.

For me, the biggest value of this Forum is the tips often found here - for a beginner like me I often wonder "how do I do that?" and often, the answer's are to be found here. 

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #6 
I had basically the same idea a few days ago while looking at some plans.

I use a similar jig for drilling holes for the exhaust on the Hotrod Freaky Fords. I don't like drilling the holes all the way through.

These are some very nice looking Fords. What wood are they? Are they finished?

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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks everyone, I am glad you found this useful.
Bob, the lighter timber is oregon, or more commonly known in the US as Douglas Fir. A friend of mine gave me a few old 4" x 4" posts which I machined down. 1st time I have used it. Ideal for 1.5" thick bodies, but I don't think it would work too well for small thin parts. The darker wood is merbau, which is a south pacific hardwood used mainly for outdoor decking here in Aust. It is very hard. Finished with the butcher block paste I have been using lately.

Cheers
Rod T
obxwoodtoys

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thank this is such a great help I would put mine on with holes in the pattern for small dowel pins holes in the body and dowels on the fenders
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #9 
I really like the color of the Douglas fir with th butcher block finish. I think I have a couple of pieces.
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