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Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #1 
This is a shot of my first plane......not really to scale but pretty darn close! the wings and fuse and vertical stabilizer are all the right size and shape but no aerodynamics......

bi plane 3 smaller.JPG  bi plane 1 smaller.JPG

Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #2 
Very nice MuskokaMike

This looks great.  I really like the lines and the black looks great against the plain wood, really pops off the page.

OK, now for the questions.
What wood did you use?
Did you paint or stain the wings?
How big is the plain?
Did you drill holes in the wings for the stabilizers?

Sorry for all the questions, but I really like your work,and what to know more.

Thanks for Sharing.


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Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #3 
No problem Ken, ask away!

1) The wings aren't painted, they're stained dark brown mahogany by goudey stains out of Toronto Ontario Canada. I find with their stains you can control the density by the sandpaper you use. I used 120 on the wings and they come out almost like an espresso......use a finer sandpaper and it comes out like regular coffee....
2)The plane measures about 13" wingspan and the fuse is about 8 3/4"
3) Yes, I drilled the holes for the supports but bottomed out before they went all the way through. I just set the stop on my drill press to where I wanted it and then drilled away. The top and bottom wing are basically identical and mirror imaged so the supports line up perfectly.

To get the ones to the fuse I did a mock up of a wing, drilled THOSE holes all the way through, then installed it on the model using the outboard supports and then drilled through the holes on the top wing, on the drill press, to get the ones in the fuse to line up properly. Then on the final wing I just didn't drill all the way through.....

One thing I learned just recently after wood working for 30 years...vernier calipers. They make life SO much easier and SO much more accurate....I use them 10x a day now....

Funny thing: the prop is pine too but it is WAY too fragile, I broke about 4 of them. I have to make one out of maple in order for it to stand up....I have to find a nice prop bolt too....that's just a round head wood screw. I want to find one more scale....maybe an old 8 x 32 or 6 x 40 something like that...
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks for all the answers.
Specially good tip about the wing mounting.
   I did not know you could control the color of the stain with the sandpaper you use.
Interesting.
   I am not as good a builder as you are, but on my Bi-Planes from Toymakingplans.com I have always used an axle peg instead of a screw or bolt to hold the propeller.  That works really good.
Looking forward to seeing more of you work.  You are really good at this toy making business.
Again Thanks

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banderson

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Reply with quote  #5 
Love the plane and the colors.  Did you mortise out the slot for the lower wing? 
I know what you mean with a fragile propeller.  My kids have broken three on the one plane I have made.
Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #6 
Controlling the stain colour:

yeah, I discovered this a few years ago when I sanded a table I made with 120 and started staining before I did the 180.....what it does is lets more of the stain soak into the material.....

BTW: I did clear coat the entire thing using armor coat clear gloss lacquer. I find I get better results than with Krylon gloss....then 320 between coats. It's baby butt smooth.....

To get proper coverage on the underside of the top wing, and the top of the bottom wing, I clear coated the fuse and bottom wing before assembly. Then glued it all up and then gave the whole thing another once over.....

Here's a rough shot of a formula one car I made....it's about 6" long....I have to tweak the wheels some and add some colour....I kind of like the look of all natural though.....

formula 1 stained smaller.JPG 
  

Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #7 
yes I did. I thought it would be stronger than just edge gluing it the fuse.....the opening is a little big, the next one will be made before the fuse is assembled. You see, it's done in 3 parts....this way you can cut the compound angles before cutting the final shape.

Take the belly for instance. It has a bulge and then tapers to the tail as well as rounded going up the sides. If I cut the fuse in one piece, it would be difficult to make either the profile or the longitude cuts. So I cut the profile, then cut out the shape (looking from above). Cut all three pieces this way then laminated them together.....then when the glue was dry that was when I realized I forgot the cut the mortise for the wing..>DOH< lol.....I'm working on another one so I will NOT forget it this time haha.....
Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #8 
   Oh, just wanted to add...I got the plans online....I did a search for wwI bi-planes and a whole bunch of plans popped up from balsa plane kits came up. If you remember as a kid Guillows makes balsa kits and I used one of those....
   I was a designer for 10 years so know AutoCAD so I downloaded the plans, modified them to work in solid wood and then printed them off.....
   The trick is to make it look like a toy as opposed to an actual scale plane done wrong. Udi is the man when it comes to this. I've tried this with cars and they just look "off"......
Udie

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Reply with quote  #9 
Muskokamike - Great finish on both the plane and racing car. Thanks for posting. I have to agree with Ken about the screw. But here's an idea ... what about making the diameter for the centre hub for the prop a little larger. Then drill a recessed hole in, screw the screw in and then cover it up with a button plug or even the top part of a axle peg. It would hide the screw, and if the prop breaks, you'll know exactly what is under the plug for a quick repair. Nice job on the landing gear by the way.

Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #10 
ah, that's a great idea...I've been toying (pun intended haha) with doing that for wheels too....

If I can dig up some scrap oak or maple I'll do just that....if I make that whole any bigger the pine just won't survive.....it's way too soft....

As for the landing gear....I wanted to give the legs more support and kind of keep them scale but out of pine, they're rather fragile. So I glued the birch dowel to them so they were nice and strong. Then I had to deal with attaching the wheels so I cut down a 4d brad nail and put it in....now you can see it though.

That's why we do prototypes to work out this little areas....my next one will be better.[smile]

As for the finish. I just use the same technic I've been using on custom furniture and cabinetry. I did a huge walk in closet that had 7 coats of lacquer.....320 between the first 5, 400 between the last two. It was mirror glass smooth.....the designer I was working with on the project couldn't keep her hands off it lol....
Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #11 
One thing about the wheels on the formula 1 car...I've been thinking of offering them using a 1/4 20 threaded rod with a lock nut on the outside (or 8 32 or 10 40) so they resemble actual formula 1 cars since they too just use one big nut....but then you get into the choking hazard thing.....I was thinking of offering this to older kids who wouldn't be prone to put them in their mouths and add a little realism to the cars....So the kids can have races and buy extra wheels and have "pit stops".....
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