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wmgeorge1

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Well in keeping with some other car projects on the CNC, such as 

IMG_3323-1.jpg I decided to venture out and try a custom hot rod type car. So enclosed is the start or prototype of what I came up with. It is still a-little rough in places but with a few tweaks here and there should be good. Also, tying out airbrushing and such, ideas from scale-model builders site. The mags and wheels were cut out on the CNC also.

Any ideas or advices on mods, please feel free to comment.

Thanks

Bill

IMG_3733.jpg  First Side IMG_3739.jpg  Glue up and bondo :-)  ..... Below the prototype, thinking of practicing pinstriping IMG_3755.jpg

BadBob

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Is the Bondo due to tear out?
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wmgeorge1

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Hi Bob -

It’s wood filler (I was trying to be funny) . I was filling in some rough grain and knot holes, using big box cheap wood..

Don’t get much in the way of tear using a combination up/down cut bit, plus I have adjusted depth of cut to be less aggressive.

Bill
BadBob

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If your going to paint it Bondo will work.  So will spot putty. The only problem I see with using it is that it fills in the grain so you get a shiney spot when you paint the wood. If your using MDF ot going for the smooth glossy paint job its not an issue.
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wmgeorge1

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You are absolutely correct on the shiney spot, been there and at first couldn't quite grasp what the heck was going on, also feathering the filler in always a fun task. MDF I found does not take paint real well, been goofing with different primers and sealers, still have not found one that works with out a bunch of heavy coats.

I remember Bondo from the old days working on my 67 chevelle, oh the memories......
BadBob

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Zinsser B-I-N White Shellac-Based Interior/Spot Exterior Primer and Sealer Is what I find works best.

I originally purchased this to use for a white base to make the color pop. Previously I use white acrylic paint on top of shellac. It worked pretty good but using the shellac based primer I get a white base and sealer in one step.

Shellac is compatible with just about any finish. It will seal pine knots. This primer is used for a sealer when repairing smoke damage after a fire. 

I just did a test on an MDF Play Pal minivan. One coat was all it took.

I get it at Home Depot in the paint department.

white-zinsser-primers-00904-64_1000.jpg 


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john lewman

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I am late to this conversation but I must say that your design skills have truly captured the spirit of hot rods.
wmgeorge1

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Thanks John - 

Have a couple more I am working through, will post when done. 

Bill
john lewman

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I have spent a lot of time staring at this CNC wood toy. Wow! First of all, I can't get over how sweeeeet your design is. I have a lot to learn about the hot rod style before I can compete with this. Another question: Are those mag wheels made on your CNC and if not is that something that your particular CNC would be capable of doing?
wmgeorge1

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Hi John,

Thanks for the compliment.

First: Yes the wheels are cutout on the CNC, these are a similar cut time to the other thread of wheels I posted.

The design I have used is a trace to vectors of an existing rod. I have all the vectors that can also be cutout on a scroll saw (KISS principle applied here). I think the next re-design I may look at front window addition. It is just easier on the CNC not to have that but not impossible.

I have another one I am just about to finish up, a modified truck/lowrider. Trying to figure out the pearl paint I am putting on it. That is also why the different wheels I created.

Anyway you are more than welcome to the vectors, and I just wrapped some small hobby tubing for the axel. LOL, the scoop is actually the cutout of the window.

Anyway thanks again

Bill
Loggerlaws

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Bill, I also would love to learn a quick way to cut out front and back windows. The only way I can think of is to cut the body out in two halves then pocket the window and then glue the two halves together. I look forward to your comments. Just been reading these old topics to see if I can learn some more from them, or if I have missed any thing.

Cheers
Raymond
wmgeorge1

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hi Raymond,

I have done a model on the CNC that I made the front windows open, but it does make the roof section a little weak. Need to make sure the side windows has a support for the open area.IMG_3297.jpg 

john lewman

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This is so cool!
phantom scroller

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Reply with quote  #14 
Good looking vehicle I like the CNC idea might give it a go on mine some day.
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