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levy.jr02

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello,  l am beginner in the field. I have little space to set up a workshop because the machines are too large for the space I have, I'm thinking of renting a suitable site, but I have doubts about the machines that have to buy in order to produce toys to market. Would anyone say what the tools to I start my projects?
  What are the best projects for beginners?
All these projects we have on this site, which would be best for those just starting out in the business? that is, for those who have little knowledge in the field.
I thank you!

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Levy Junnior

Bucko

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Reply with quote  #2 
I would think that to start off you could price scroll saws in your local area. Decide if you want to purchase one then find some pieces of Pine Wood at your local home supply store and download the free Play Pal set on this site and give it a try making. Seems like those that sell this type of item say painted bright colors do well. Good luck and give it a try--
ctowne

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Levy -
You present a very good question.  With all there are different folks on this site each seem to have their favorite "main" tool.  Scroll saw, table saw, band saw.  But many of the plans on this site work best with a scroll saw and a drill.  As Bucko said, the free plans are geared toward scrolls saw.  They are a great way to begin the process and build your skills.  I didn't know much about the scroll saw but when I watched someone use it, I realize how versatile it can be.  It was the best purchase I've made. 
Cindy
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #4 
Good Morning Levy
   You are so in the right place if you want to make toys.  I have never seen plans as easy to follow as the plans here on Toymakingplans.com.  If you want to learn anything about making toys the Forum is the right place to find answers.
   I agree with what Bucko and Cindy said above.
I started with a $100.00 scroll saw from Sears and a few other tools.  There is a book you can buy on line called "Scroll Saw Workbook" by John A. Nelson.  I bought that book and did all the lessons in it over and over.  Then started learning more by watching all the videos I could find on line.
   However, the best lessons will come when you start cutting toys out and you will see what you can and can not do.  
I would start like Bucko said with the play pals first, because that is a free plan and something easy to cut.  If you plan to paint you toys, you can cut them out of MDF.  The reason I say MDF to start with is it is so easy to cut and sand, there is a little learning curve about painting MDF, but that is another story.  Then go to plain Pine wood, again because is is easy to cut, sand, and paint.
Two fun easy plans are the 1957 corvette and the Martin motor cars.  Both are easy and fast and will help your cutting skills.
   I have the same issue you do with space, so I mounted everything in my garage shop on wheels, so on nice days, I can roll everything out into my driveway from the garage and work out there. Note: I live in California so we have a lot of nice days.
   Good luck with your new adventure into toy making and have fun.

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KenFM

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Reply with quote  #5 
I agree with Cindy a scroll saw is probably the most important machine to purchase. Check it is easy and quick to change the blades and I would recommend pin less blades Enjoy
Ken
Udie

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Reply with quote  #6 
Levy.jr02 - Great couple of questions - Plans for Beginners and Toys to Market.
   Toymakingplans.com offers quite a selection of easy build plan sets, the Free Play Pals for example, and other similar plans where profile cutting is necessary. All of which use common wood thicknesses which should be easy for you to procure. For these types of plan sets the scroll saw is the tool for you, just like the other members have suggested.
   And to help you with the sanding, you may consider purchasing a set of sanding drums as well as making your own sanding drum jig, providing you have a drill press. See the June 11/14 issue of WTN (Wood Toy News).
   A drill press would also be a sound investment not only for drilling holes, but as mentioned above for sanding, as well as using hole saws to make you own wheels at very little cost.

   Toymakingplans.com also offers a wonderful selection of toys where a table saw would be the tool of choice. There are quite a lot of easy build projects from play towns, vehicles and buildings.

It really boils down to selecting which type of toy you wish to market.
Hope some of this is helpful and looking forward to seeing your projects.
levy.jr02

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[smile] Obrigado a todos! - Thank you all!
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Levy Junnior

Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #8 
   Well, I have to agree, scroll saw/band saw and drill press.....you'd be surprised what you can do with those two alone...plus a decent table saw and or a chop saw. If you want to get into production work you'll need at least those 4 to start. I probably have over $10,000.00 in power tools and find myself lacking in some areas....
   Not sure where you live but where I am, there are LOTS of used machines available. Just the other day I saw a mini-lathe and scroll saw for sale for $100 Cdn for both......
   When I described machines, I used the word "decent". I found that I have wasted hundreds of dollars buying budget equipment only to have issues with them. That old saying is true: you only get what you pay for. My first table saw was a POS delta portable and it truly was garbage. Dangerously so. I say dangerously so because the fence kept going out of square and would cause massive kickback that can seriously injure or kill you. I actually wrote to the Delta and told them to improve it or take it off the market.....same as chopsaws....I had an $80 unit that would too always go out of square....then bought a nice 10" double bevel dewalt and I check it every 6 months and it rarely needs a tune up...and it's 7 or 8 years old now.
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Muskokamike for the info about Tools.
   I did the same thing when starting out, buying my tools from Sears.  Craftsman makes some good tools, but when you start upgrading to quality tools you really see the difference.
My craftsman table saw broke several times and was very frustrating, I just bought a Stop Saw, and can not believe the difference in construction, safety, and how great it cuts.
I still have the 1st Craftsman Scroll saw I bought and it is still working, but I have upgraded to several better scroll saws.
   Why don't we believe the saying; " you get what you pay for" until afterwards.  Experience is a hard teacher.

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garywisbey

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Reply with quote  #10 
i was giving a really chepe scroll saw and i really did not get on with it well so i picked up a better unit and got to work just cutting things out of pine wood i work out of a small shed so not a lot of room i cut sheet goods up in the garden with a saw.as others have said download the free playpal plan and have a play.
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JTalbot

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Reply with quote  #11 
My advice is to start with a scroll saw, drill press, and a small band saw. Put everything on wheels, and keep your eyes on Craig's list. Start with the playpals plans set. They offer you an introduction to toymaking. There are plans available from all over the internet, ranging from free, and on up. But I will tell you that the plans from this site set the standards, they are worth every penny. And if you have any questions, there are plenty of fine folks that will guide you thru it, with this forum. Take the time to read thru all the how to threads, watch the videos. One last thing, make sure you are having fun doing it!
Jeremy

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Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #12 
   Believe me, we've all been there cutting big pieces smaller so we can fit them in a shop....I had a customer want 1" thick MDF for his daughter's desk countertop....they put it in my pickup with a forklift and I couldn't even budge it let alone lift it. So before they put it in I had them slide some scraps underneath so I could use my circular saw to cut it down to manageable sizes...then I could carry those in......
   Not sure where you live but Home Depot will cut up sheets to manageable sizes (mostly free of charge). Since I had to let my shop go and now work out of my basement that's the way to go now....
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