Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Wombat

Registered:
Posts: 254
Reply with quote  #1 
After noticing how colour drew children's attention  at my Christmas Fete stall, I decided I had better make a batch of colourful cars to add to my display next time.
 The Freaky Fords  seemed like the perfect choice on two grounds.
 Firstly they do look cool. Secondly, it would give me an opportunity to stretch my skills to cutting 1-1/2" thick wood on the scroll-saw, something I had not done before.
I had to laminate two 3/4" (19mm) thick planks to get the desired thickness, and with a little forethought, I was able to set the T-Bucket up so that the windscreen slot could be cut first on my bench saw, then the passenger hole could be drilled, followed by all the dowel holes and window opening starter holes before cutting out the profiles.
Taking advice from all the posts here regarding  the use of a #9 skip tooth blade, I quickly found the right machine and feed speed(slooow), although the first few items needed a fair bit of sanding to reach the lines. I got closer as I got more practice.

Rummaging through my favourite store, Bunnings, I found some great bright colours in rattle cans, and some "chrome" spray.  AES gave me some great advice last year re using rattle cans in summer heat, I applied that and it helped.
I recall from my youth, that wheels were painted body colours and exhausts and hub-caps just had to be chromed.  The wheel centres were brushed using some paint sprayed into a tin, left long enough to let most of the solvents evaporate.... a small window of usability.
Taking a leaf from BadBobs posts, I chose to use a light stain and varnish for the tyres, rather than black paint.
 I am happy with the results. 

(ps. please excuse the oblong smudge in each of the photos. Picked up a speck of ash inside the lens assembly whilst visiting Pompeii last year and it will cost more to dismantle and clean the camera than it will to buy a new one)
20200105_161515.jpg  20200125_120932.jpg  20200124_144054.jpg  P1080660.jpg  P1080668.jpg  P1080670.jpg  P1080672.jpg  P1080674.jpg  P1080675.jpg  P1080677.jpg  P1080679.jpg  P1080684.jpg  20200105_161504.jpg



Peter V

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 257
Reply with quote  #2 

very nice Wombat,

is it an idea for the next time to change the colour of the wheels with other coloured cars, i.e. red wheels, yellow (or blue or whatever colour) car? 

Or 4 different colour wheels at each car? 


__________________
Greetings,

Peter V
eburres

Registered:
Posts: 25
Reply with quote  #3 
These look great. I made a couple of sets of these for Christmas but left them natural. I'm now in the process of making a couple more sets that I will paint. I hope mine turn out half as good as yours. Well done!
john lewman

Avatar / Picture

Owner, ToymakingPlans.com
Registered:
Posts: 2,805
Reply with quote  #4 
This post is so inspirational this morning. I love the color finishes, the attention to detail and the great photos. A post like this is just what I need to be energized for the day. I am feeling a creative rush from it!
BadBob

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,617
Reply with quote  #5 
These are awesome. I especially like the purple.

I like to make mine without the windshield. It just seemed like a weak spot, and I didn't like having the sharp corners. I play around a bit with plastics like plexiglass and clear acrylic but found them to be too fragile and expensive for my taste.

I found that drilling the hole for the peg man in the T-Bucket was much easier and produced better results after I  assembled the car. Using a bit of low tack painters tape and a sharp brad-point bit helps to keep the paint from chipping. I don't paint inside the holes.

This One now lives in Germany.

20181130-122115 - 663393841 Handmade Wooden Toy Car - Hot Rod 1927 T-B.jpg 



__________________
Advanced techniques are the basics perfectly applied.
Odin's Toy Factory Etsy Store
Facebook
Pinterest
Blogger
Forum Photo Album

LinkedIn
YouTube
Google Photos Toys Album

flamepainter

Registered:
Posts: 129
Reply with quote  #6 
Great job Wombat. I really like the color choices and how you coordinated the wheel colors. All you need now is to try your hand at adding some flames. They are great just as they are!
Jim
Wombat

Registered:
Posts: 254
Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you all for your positive comments.
With a long list of other plans to complete, I doubt I will do more of these soon.

Peter, I am far too conservative to do four different colour wheels  on a Hot-Rod,  but perhaps on a clown car?

Robert, I too experimented with perspex for the windscreen of the T-bucket but did not like being able to see the inside of the slot , and gluing would have needed CA or similar.  Unless one can get some quality scraps,  I agree it is too expensive.
I like to experience the full intent of the plans, as John hides plenty of little technique challenges in them, so windscreens it is.  Did get a minor paint/wood chip-out on the red one when removing the piece of ply put in the slot to mask the paint, but once it is all glued up it seems strong enough. I paint only when all woodworking is finished to avoid the risk of paint damage, and in my mind, if it isn't fully painted, it isn't fully finished. 
Then again, if I had an airbrush, maybe painting small sections would not be so daunting.

Jim, had a look at your flame-painted ones, and I know that is one talent I don't have. No artistry in this black duck! 
PaPa Jack

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 192
Reply with quote  #8 
Would someone please help me
Here. If you are US toymaker. These toys are great and I love them. However were they made to be sold? If so how much? I am having difficulty justifying time to make and paint vs potential pricing to sell. Appreciate any comments
BadBob

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,617
Reply with quote  #9 

Currently, I sell mine for $35 each. I think this is cheap for the quality of the build. If there is some little defect, I will sell at a reduced price. I plan to increase prices.

It depends on a lot of factors. There is no magic formula. You have to consider your market, how much time does it take to make them, what materials do you make them from and overhead, to name a few. Lots of people leave out costs like going to buy lumber and other materials and transportation. For example, a trip to the post office costs me about $4.00 US. My current best estimate for overhead costs is about 35%. I break even on a toy that sells for $10.00 US. The trick is to figure out how to make something you can make fast and sell at a profit.

Many toy makers (me) undervalue their work and hurt themselves. I'm not Walmart, don't have sales, or give discounts. Prices are not negotiable. They sell lots of items but burn out fast. Selling is work.

You have to work this all out for yourself.

All that said, I know people that make a living sell wood crafts that I would throw in the burn pile.


__________________
Advanced techniques are the basics perfectly applied.
Odin's Toy Factory Etsy Store
Facebook
Pinterest
Blogger
Forum Photo Album

LinkedIn
YouTube
Google Photos Toys Album

eburres

Registered:
Posts: 25
Reply with quote  #10 
Great advice, Bob. It's a big help to those of us who are relative newcomers to toy building and potentially selling our work. Thanks!
Wombat

Registered:
Posts: 254
Reply with quote  #11 
Hello Papa Jack.

As implied in the opening line of this post, these Hot Rods were made to be sold at school fetes.
For what it is worth, I am an Australian, but I imagine what is below will apply equally well to others.

Painting does add a layer of complexity and a bunch more time  compared to simply slapping on a bit of beeswax. However, my market is kids. Kids like colour. I made a box-full of natural finished toys for my last stall and they went largely un-noticed, despite pocket-money prices. Certainly the parents thought they looked OK but if the kid did not --- no sale.

I have worked out that the materials for these Hot Rods cost me around $5US to make ( $7.50 Au) each.
I buy DAR timber, paint, glue, and sandpaper from a big-box store so I know how much the material costs.  
I weigh my spray-paint containers before and after the job to pro-rata their contribution to the job cost.
 I measure out my sandpaper  and glue similarly so I can work out consumables cost. 
I don't go to the extreme of measuring travel costs as everything is so close by. Ditto electricity and depreciation on tools.
This is, after all, primarily a hobby.

I don't sell on ebay or etsy. I don't consider myself to be "in business".
I will give away a few of these Hot-Rods to my grandchildren and a couple of deserving neighbours' kids, the rest will go into the fete stock with a price tag of $20-25AU. Three times material costs seems to work out right for me.
I will make enough money to replace my stocks of wood, paint, glue and sandpaper and continue making other toys. The small profit pays for more plans.

If you have to justify every part of the time and effort you put into making things for a profit, you are doing toy making for the wrong reasons.
You will either end up with cheap toys that don't sell because they're crap, or high quality stuff that doesn't sell because it is too expensive.

I don't overvalue my work to get an ego-stroke every time some one buys it ( Wow they think my work is worth that much).   I don't make the mistake of believing that what my hourly rate was when I was employed as a (insert your job here) is what my retired time is worth making toys.
I get my satisfaction from knowing someone wants what I make, can afford it, and thus will buy it and, most importantly,  get to enjoy it.





john lewman

Avatar / Picture

Owner, ToymakingPlans.com
Registered:
Posts: 2,805
Reply with quote  #12 
Well said and great info. Thanks for posting.
Peter V

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 257
Reply with quote  #13 

Hello all,

well said indeed.

As the windscreen is concerned, why not fix or secure those with 2 (or 3 sort of little dowels/toothpicks), drilled under such an angle that it goos from upstanding part - window - ´dashboard´. Sand those flush and that´s it. No glue needed at all.

When you see the marks, those indicate windscreen whipers.

Other idea is, when not sanding those dowels/picks completely flush, you can mount 2 little scrap peaces of wood on them, as windscreen-whipers. A bit more work (5 minutes), but add a big´reality´to it.
 


__________________
Greetings,

Peter V
lcb914

Registered:
Posts: 41
Reply with quote  #14 
Great idea!

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.