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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #31 
Udie,

I believe I mentioned earlier that I should have sealed them with shellac. I had hoped the the primer would have sealed it but It was obviously not designed to be sanded. I've used latex primers in the past that both sealed and filled the small imperfections and sanded well. I had almost a quart of it and wanted to give it a try.  If it had worked it would prime lots of toys.

I've watched every video on the site. Read every news letter and every post in the forum.

If you look closely at the exhaust holes in this photo you can see the swelling. It improve some with every paint/sanding cycle, but I never got rid of it.

20151212_063149.jpg 



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ctowne

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Reply with quote  #32 
Colors looking good!!!!
Cindy
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #33 
The red on the Bucket-T (it says hot rod red on the label) is an experiment with glossy acrylic paint. I really don't like it.

  • doesn't flow out well show it shows the brush marks
  • shows every little defect
  • tends to clog the sandpaper
  • After its dry it still has a sticky feel to it

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #34 
The MDF Hot Rod Freaky Fords are done. I think they could have been better but I learned a lot about working with MDF and painting toys. My big take-a-way is that I really need to learn to spray with acrylics. Painting these with a brush takes to long. I have two air brush kits, an air compressor, and a touch up gun. I just need to get these out and learn to use them.

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IanPlant

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Reply with quote  #35 
they look great [thumb] and thank you for sharing your journey with us [smile]
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Ian  [thumb]keep making children happy
john lewman

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Reply with quote  #36 
These are keepers. 50 years from now they will still be favorites. I know because that has been my experience. Toys I made in the 60's are still treasured by family and friends and I have seen them under the tree as decorations even this year!
Udie

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Reply with quote  #37 
BadBob

I tried to mimic your swelling problem in the shop.
Drilled a bunch of holes in MDF and just can't get the same results.
I have no idea why you are seeing that before.

Finished cars look fantastic thanks for posting.

I would like to suggest you try painting a couple with metallic paints.
I think you will be very pleased with the results.
 

BadBob

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Reply with quote  #38 
Udie,

There are three types of MDF but that can be a bit misleading since it is manufactured using everything from hardwood fibre to waste paper. Swelling around holes is a common problem. It is generally caused by poor priming or using a water based primer. The fix is to use a solvent based primer that seals the MDF. A google search for "nail hole pucker MDF" will get you plenty of references. It;s mentioned on the MDF page of Wikipedia.

The primer I used was a water based primer that didn't keep the moisture out. The primer itself caused the puckering and slight swelling of the edges. Sand it smooth and apply another coat and it puckers again because I sanded off some of what sealing coat there was to flatten the puckered areas.  I slowly got better but I never got rid of it and just quit trying. The holes had swelled enough internally that I had to redrill them to get the dowels and axle pins in. They wer tight enough that if I were brave enough to drive them in I probably would not have needed any glue.

I use Tightbond III for my glue and I noticed right away that I had very little tine it get the dowels in in place. I assume that the water in the glue causes the MDF to swell slightly causing the hole to tighten up. Sanding the dowels a little helped some. If I had used through dowels as called for in the plans I don't think I could have inserted them. As it was I had to drive the exhaust dowels in with a small mallet. In one case I used a vise to press them in. Some solutions for this problem:

  • Drill the holes 1/32 or 1/64 inch larger when using MDF
  • Use a glue that dosen't contain water. Epoxy would work great for this.

I'm new to using MDF and plan to use up what I have. It's possible that I would like it better if I had more experience with it. 


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Steve W

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Reply with quote  #39 
I hope you have had fun making the hotrods, they look great painted. I think they are a nice toy for a child to play with . I made the Sedan and deuce coupe a good while ago out of a 3 by 2 " stud wall timber which ends up at 1 1/2" wide. I altered the shape slightly to incorporate a blower bulge on the front end like the T bucket. Painted each in a bold Acrylic Red or blue and with the addition of slick wide wheels on the back and narrow smaller ones fitted to the front. Painted in black and white wheel rims they looked great and my grandson loved them.
I do prefer to make models in wood you seems to be able to get better definition to radiused edges and chamfers. When using mdf I have found I had to use new really sharp Brad point drills to stop swellings and you always got a fibre creep closing up the drilled holes which I continually opened up with rasp drills.
When you start thinking about the manufacture of MDF it has been forced together under great pressure so any cut raw edge is always going to break up and swell as solid wood will really only splinter.
Have fun in the shed everyone.
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #40 
The drills I used to initially drill the holes were very sharp. I use what Lee Vally Tools calls a lipped bit.

What is a rasp drill?


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ctowne

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Reply with quote  #41 
These are great - excellent finish.
Cindy
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