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Pobble

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Reply with quote  #1 
When you have you pattern stuck on your wood, how close do you cut to the edges?
Right up close or a small distance away and sand up to the edge?
Just wondering which is the most accurate way?
Pobble
Udie

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Reply with quote  #2 
Pobble - Good question - let me try and help you with what it do.
Cutting to the line or an exact width, etc. is something you do on a table saw.
The scroll saw is a different beast.
   If you are cutting a Play Pal vehicle or a shape for example (dog, people or farm animal), and it does not have to mate up with another part it really does not matter if you are on the line, inside or outside the line. Good chance you will be sanding it down by hand a little or use a drum sander to give it that smooth flowing edge. Who is going to know that you did not follow the line except you.
   If you are cutting a part that will mate up to another part (for example the Martin Motors Craft Show Classics) which have an upper and lower parts which mate together, then cutting on the line would be the preferred method. Same goes with any puzzle type project, cutting on the line would be preferred.
Another good example would be the Martin Motors Car carrier.
   Let's say you are building any vehicle that has multiple inside profiles all of which are the same and will be gluing them together, then maybe cutting outside the line would be the way to go and then sand down to the line.
   It really depends on what you are making.
What project did you have in mind?

Pobble

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for the reply Udie.
   I did not have a specific project in mind, I was just curious as to what method members used.
   I had tried one of the Play Pal vehicles and, due to inexperience with a scroll saw, found it not easy to follow the lines exactly.
Good point though about faces that have to mate up, I'll bear that in mind.
Hence the question.
Thanks
Pobble
Muskokamike

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Posts: 153
Reply with quote  #4 
Do you have a router mounted in a router table and a pattern bit with a bearing? If you do, and are going to make many copies of each version, make one good pattern one out of 1/4" acrylic or MDF, then do rough cuts on a blank, and use the pattern bit to clean it up to make an exact duplicate....
ctowne

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Reply with quote  #5 
Pobble - just agreeing with what Udie said but also letting you know it takes some time to get cutting on the line so be patient with yourself - accuracy improves with practice.  On stand alone pieces you will be the only one that you weren't exactly on the line.
Cindy
Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #6 
EXACTLY...I was working on the tanks for my peterbilt and one turned out 1/16" longer than the other...OMG.....ahem...no one is going to see it and no one is going to be measuring them with vernier calipers lol....
Pobble

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks for the helpful replies.
   I was planning on making some patterns using my router and will probably use mdf.
   Accuracy is not particularly critical as what I make will probably be for my 2 grandsons (3 & 1) so they won't be worried if it is not perfect. But you know what it is like when you know something is not quiet right and it bugs you every time you see it.
Pobble
Udie

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Reply with quote  #8 
Pobble - Going to use the router table to make multiples. Take a look at the link to a WTN (Wood Toy News) article and video which demonstrates how I used my router table to do exactly that.
Making Multiples on the Router Table Article.
Making Multiples on the Router Table Video.
You may find some things of interest after watching the video.
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