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Bry

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi, I am wondering how you guys cut down the thickness of your wood ie from 7/8inches thick to say 3/8inches thick by 4inches wide, I only have a small workshop so a planer/thicknesser is out of the question. I have a store of 1inch thick wood so it would be a shame to waste it.Bright ideas required please
Josiah Benedict

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Bry,
It depends on how wide the pieces are. I use a table saw with a ten inch blade and that gives me about 3+" of blade above the table to rip pieces from a 2 x 4. It goes a little slow and be sure and use a push stick to push and another push stick to hold the wood snug against the fence. I've made a lot of thin stock this way. I also use a bandsaw setup to do the same thing. I rip pieces as big as 8" wide on my band saw. I use a wide blade and a home-made fence with two push sticks as I said before. Slow going makes for pretty nice thin lumber. I often finish sand individual pieces with a big wide block sander I made. There are lots of ways to make accurate thicknesses after you've made your cuts. If you are interested I could explain a couple of those.
Wiley Rufus Peak

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Bry,
I agree with Josiah that this is a good method-especially for small toy parts. I clamp the parts from the side and then use a block sander to smooth the parts up. I sometimes use a piece of steel on each side that is the thickness I want the board to be. Then I use a flat board with a piece of sandpaper glued to it that spans the two pieces of steel with the wood to be sanded between them. The steel acts as a guide for the big block sander and keeps it from going too deep or from wobbling and it makes a perfect part. Sounds kind of complicated but its easy. If I don't have steel I use a piece of oak or very hard wood. This is best when sanding soft woods. The hard woods will be hard to sand and the soft woods will give away to smoothness. Oh by the way, it is very convenient for me when I search forums to remember the picture avatar that each member has. The forum gives out the silhouette, but they are all identical. When I go to search I can't remember a name at all and especially not as well as I remember a face . If it isn't too much trouble could you load up an avatar that's a pic of you or anything else you think is right? I go to a lot of forums and it really helps. I think it also get folks to reply better if the avatar is something that rings a bell.
garywisbey

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Reply with quote  #4 
all i use a band saw to resize wood you can put it into a planer to resize it but you do waist a lot that way some times i leave the wood the size it is and make the toys that size.
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PaPa Jack

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Bry, I too have a problem with all of the patterns that call for 1/8 " wood pieces. I have encouraged John L not to have plans with that small of a cut. I use a table saw for cutting strips and when it needs to be 1/8 it drops down in saw. I have been somewhat succesful with taping the entire opening over the blade with duck tape or a large piece of fiberboard and then raising the blade through it. It makes a satisfactory closure. Would be better if I had a "[redface]": clearance plate but my saw does not make it available and lip to plate is too small to make one. I have not been too successful using the band saw. If the wood is more than the blade height, I turn it over and pass it thru again. I make a lot of toys using the the 2x4's and putting fendersm etc to really dress them up. Hope this information is helpful. I look forward to hearing other ideas.
Josiah Benedict

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi PaPa Jack,
I have a similar issue with my table saw and I fixed it. I set the fence at 18" from bladde. I lower the blade below table height. Then I bump a sheet of 1/4" hardboard against the fence that covers the table and clamp it down. Sometimes I just duct tape it down with a few tight strips over the edges. I then turn on the saw and crank the blade up thru the hardboard to the right height for the job. Makes a perfect zero clearance every time.
Josiah


PaPa Jack

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hello Josiah, I actually did that. Do you take it up each time you need other widths? Save board for just 1/8 " cuts or do you have other boards for other narrow widths? I just cut my finger again ! What kind of pusher do you use., Thanks
Udie

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Reply with quote  #8 
PaPaJack, I to have occasionally used my fingers as a push stick. But not anymore. I now use a lot of ‘Push Blocks’ with my ZCS (Zero Clearance Surface). Photo 1 shows three I just made out of 3 kinds of wood. Spruce, Weather Treated and Cedar all of which I call framing lumber. They are used by placing it on top of the wood you wish to cut and the block rides against the inside edge of the rip fence. On the back you can see a replaceable heel. Photo 1B shows a well-used one in use. Photo 2 is a stepped pushed block. It has seven steps to support the most common sizes of stock wood. Photo 3 shows it being used and to rip 1/4" materials using step one position and photo 4 show its use on 3/4" stock materials, step 3. It is a ‘U’ shaped push block that cradles over the table saw rip fence. Very easy to make and safe, your hands are nowhere near the blade when used. Photo 5 shows its side view. I am limited to 5 photos per post. I will continue with an additional post.

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Udie

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Reply with quote  #9 
Here is part 2. Photo 5 shows its side view. Photo 6 is another cradle push block made specifically to rip the 1-1/2” side edge of 2 x 4s. Again the double thickness on the left is so that the blade is not exposed during cutting. This is only a demo photo. Normally the rip fence would be 1/8 or 1/4" from the saw blade. Blade height should only be just enough to cut thru the wood. After cutting strips i can glue them up to make wide panels and after glueing just a little sanding. All of the cradle type of push blocks has a replaceable heel, which is a hard wood. I am currently putting together an article with more details on each type. Lastly is my favorite shop tool the MicroJig GRR-Ripper, photo 6. Full protection with high accuracy. Ken Martin just posted a topic in 'Discuss Tools and Machinery' of his first time use. Hope this is some help. I would like to see what other type of push stick/blocks the community is using.

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