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Wooddawg

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have been trying to build the Super Car Carrier. Started with the cars, I am having the toughest time with the scroll saw. I cut a piece on it, sand it down, and no part matches. I had to trim a piece down to 1/4" and it broke into two pieces. My band saw no work, can't get blade to stay on wheels. I had to take 2+ years off due to health reasons. Couple months ago I told the doctor I was going to start back with my hobby, toy making. Told him if I didn't it wouldn't be long before I took a dive off the deep end. I was so tired of doing nothing all day.

He said for me to be extremely careful, to do my best at not getting cut. I have been doing quite well, go slow so as to take my time. But this scroll saw is whipping me. Never in my life have I been able to make two items, by hand, that matched. Must be a right brain, left brain thing. I know...Keep Practicing...Practice, Practice, Practice.

Today I am going to start building the Biplane. Putting the car carrier on hold. I have a new Grandson, born December and my daughter has asked me to build him a Rocking Horse. Large pieces, yet I still have to cut out the rockers to match, oh brother.

This is getting a bit long, sorry. Thanks for listening.
-Don
ctowne

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Reply with quote  #2 
Sorry you are having troubles, hang in there.  I really have trouble staying on any line.  Don't really know what my problem is but I have got better with time.  The blades make a huge difference, I use good ones.  Lots of the plans are designed that the middle car body piece is a little bigger than the outer side pieces.  I haven't made the specific plan you are working on but the offset design in the others hides when you don't exactly stay on the line and it gives the car/truck a visual look.  Probably not explaining that right, I do remember a post long ago where someone was frustrated with the pieces not fitting and the pieces were designed to not be exact. 
Hang in there.
Cindy
Wooddawg

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Cindy, Your support is greatly appreciated. I do wonder why the middle piece has to be two instead of one piece. Don
ctowne

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Reply with quote  #4 
On the center pieces if they are 3/4" thick each, some saws can cut both at once (2 pieces glued =1.5") and some can't.  Some people are not comfortable cutting at 1.5" thick wood, other can do it with ease.  The plans give you two parts for the center if you like to cut only at the 3/4" size or if you are using denser wood.  If you are comfortable cutting at 1.5", go for it, far less sanding. 
Bucko

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Reply with quote  #5 
Don, I don't have the car carrier plan but went and looked at it and it's a fine one indeed. Have you thought of putting the double stick side tape between 2 pcs and cutting the pattern once. I do this often( tip- don't squeeze pcs together too tight). If I can help you get past a hurdle on the carrier let me know and I'll get the plan , cut your hurdle and send it you and you can move on towards completion.
ed357sw

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Reply with quote  #6 
wooddawg,

Hang in there. Not sure what scroll saw you have but ...

some fairly easy things to check are...

1: make sure your blade is square to the table (sounds like a no brainier) but if it is off even a little bit it can cause issues. a simple check is to use a small square, sit it flat on the table and slide it next to the blade. If the blade is square to the table you will not see any gaps, a simple thing but not always obvious.

2: Make sure the tension is correct. Most things say it should sound like musical note "C" but if you just flick it with a finger it should not be loose or floppy side to side.

3: and of course the correct blade makes a huge difference as well I tend to use #5 -#7 or #9 ultra reverse and if you have variable speed I tend to keep mine at around 5 or 6 maybe 7. And on my scroll saw tension is always set to 3.5 on the scale

4: and one last thing is to just gently feed the wood into the blade. when the blade is new it will almost cut itself especially on poplar

this is just my 2 cents worth and I'm sure others will chime in. Toy making should be a fun none stressful thing LOL



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Udie

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Reply with quote  #7 
Wooddawg
Here's a Forum post you may find interesting.
Shows you how to check if you blade is perpendicular to the scroll saw table.
There is even a video to watch.
Title: Scroll Saw Tune Up
Wooddawg

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Reply with quote  #8 
I want to Thank Ya'll for the support and the fabulous advise each has given me. The suggestions I have received has guided me to this: 1st-I need to check the alignment of all aspects of my scroll saw, table, blade and more. 2nd-Learn which blade is correct for the job ahead. 3rd-I cut a thick board (2x4) so that I could cut out the 1/4" pieces needed, this was to work on the premise of bundles, didn't work. I am going to try using the thickness specified in the plans. Going to require additional cutting, no problem, I want the project to look good.

And 4th: Practice, Practice, Practice...No more Frustration Allowed (Right).

Again...Thank You So Much-Don 
dmjones

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi. I am new to the hobby myself. When it comes to making two or more exact parts, I use the method Udie uses. You can find his work on the toymaking plans videos. It is under the freaky fords. He makes a template  and then attaches it to a piece of plexiglass and simply routes out all the pieces he needs. That is such a great idea. I use it on my freaky fords and man does it work good. I hope you find the video I am talking about. Good luck and hang in there.
Udie

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Reply with quote  #10 

dmjones
Glad you liked the video and gave it a try and were successful on your builds.
Hope you will create a new post and show us what you have made.

Here are the links you referred to.
They can be found in the May 23, 2104 WTN (Wood Toy News).
Udie build the Freaky Ford Coupe - PDF
This PDF has an accompanying video also.
Udie builds the Freaky Ford Coupe - Video

You may wish to read and view another WTN dated February 4, 2014.
How to Quickly Make Multiple Toy Parts Using Router Bits - PDF
and it's accompanying video
How to Quickly Make Multiple Toy Parts Using Router Bits - Video.










 

Rod T

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Reply with quote  #11 
Some good responses and advice here Don. For me it took a while to stop pushing the work piece from side to side while cutting. This bends the blade sideways and by doing this it becomes very hard to follow the line. This is because the blade is trying to spring back to the centre. Especially on tight turns. A bit hard to explain, but you need to keep an eye on where the blade aligns on the saw as you are cutting. When you get to turns, try to spin the piece around the bend without bending the blade to either side. I am probably confusing you more. Can anyone else explain this better?? If you know what I am talking about!!
I found once I got the hang of this, it became so much easier to follow the line. Also helps with breaking blades.
Hope this helps

Cheers
Rod T
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