Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
Wiley Rufus Peak

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #1 
Can a cheap scroll saw work for making some toys? Mine is borrowed and I need to get my own. I want to spend around $200 or so and less would be better. I just want to make small toys with it. Thanks, Wiley
gilljc

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Wiley
my first scrollsaw was basic model from screwfix, about £70 I think, it is limited to pin end blades, which was limiting me only in my wish to do finer fretwork patterns. I kept an eye out on e-bay and got a hegner multicut1 for less than £300. since then I have been able to do all sorts of stuff, fine fretwork and double bevel inlay, which sounded hard, but was quite easy once I got my head on the right way up as to which piece was sliding into where.
So really in my (very limited) experience don't think it should matter too much for toys. finer blades usually = less sanding - but I am still on huge learning curve and learning new stuff all the time
Gill
gilljc

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #3 
also my hegner has variable speed, which I haven't used very often, so don't know if it is benefit or not.......
Udie

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,179
Reply with quote  #4 
Wiley ... take a look at what I wrote for Roe and Milly, 07-02-2013. They had the same question and I gave them my thoughts on what to look for when purchasing a scroll saw. I think you may find it usefull also.
garywisbey

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 238
Reply with quote  #5 
like gilljc i got hold of a ex school hegner scrollsaw on ebay i think it might be a multicut1 it takes the pinless blades but you can use a fine blade for fine fretwork or if im making toys and cutting 50mm thick you can use a bigger blade i have found the var speed is nice if you cut metal then you can slow it down some but when cutting wood i just leave the speed wear it is seems to work for me.
__________________
Gary Wisbey
https://www.etsy.com/shop/nobatteriesrequired
john lewman

Avatar / Picture

Owner, ToymakingPlans.com
Registered:
Posts: 2,467
Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Wiley, I've had good luck with a Porter Cable scroll saw from Lowes Home Improvement Center. It was $199 on sale with a stand and is a pin blade scroll saw. The toys don't have fretwork so it hasn't been an issue to not have pinless blades. It's not a perfect solution but it is a good, reliable saw. I did replace the little plastic insert that pops in around the blade on the table. I made my own from 1/8" Masonite that I sanded down to the level of the table. It makes a solid zero clearance fit with the blade and when it gets worn I replace it with a new one.
ShermFrancisco

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #7 
Wiley, I have found that a scroll saw is a personal preference type of tool and I would suggest the same thing I wrote to a couple just starting into toymaking last week.Visit a woodworking association and talk to some of the older members who are building the same type of toys.They will help clarify what's available, any problems they encountered, get you intouch with other members who are scrollsaw enthusiasts, and set you up using their equipment. These members are poud people and enjoy helping others such as you.

Once you decide which scroll saw you want then start looking for sales. There may be people in the woodworking group that are selling their saw or know of someone who is getting out of woodworking. It's funny but there are a lot of people that are always upgrading to the newest tool just to say they have it, even though there is no real difference in the new tool. In other words there are always sales on tools which can significantly reduce the price of a perfectly good quality tool. It's like shopping for a used car. Check the age, the usage,etc. Again the woodworking group can be of big help when selecting a used scroll saw.

I have had several saws but my personal preference at this point is the Dewalt. I have had it for many years and I am happy with it. I bought it new and on sale. It normally sold for $600+ dollars and I found it on sale for $500.00 and It included the stand and light. The Delta scrollsaw is basically identical to the Dewalt (same company). You have to try out the different saws and then make your decision. You may also go to a woodworking supply store in your area and work with one of the salespeople and test several of their saws.

However, the woodworking group is your best solution if they will let you build one or more toys using one or more members tools and then make your decision. You will be amazed with seeing the things these people build. It could open up a whole new career for you, outside of just toys.

Thank you for your time. Sherm Francisco
Hambone

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #8 
The small/medium size toys that I make are for our charitable woodworking project. The larger, more complex toys that I usually buy from toymaking plans are piling up in my home. I'm going to put a few in the barber shop to see if they sell to get my costs back. I'm not interested in flea markets or craft shows. Any ideas? Thanks.
__________________

Hambone
Liz Crawford

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Hambone, boy you opened up a one tough subject but it's really one that is worth the fuss. I've sold thousands of puzzles in my lifetime and it was slow to get started. But finally for a while there my hubby and I couldn't make as many as people wanted. It just kept getting more and more. We goofed and didn't keep adding new stuff so the selling kind of drifted down to a trickle when our toys became so dated nobody wanted them. The only thing I can say about the big toys is that when you find a buyer they really want them and will pay good money. We sold a lot of big stuff to day nurseries and that was a good thing. I think that you should look into Etsy.com. I see that Susan Burkhart's "oohlookitsarabbit" site on Etsy is neat. She is in the toymakingplans.com "meet your toymakers". Also I see that Dave Szepanek in the "meet your toymakers" makes big stuff as do some of those guys in the Wood Toy News. I would drop them a note. I know that good big toys can bring big bucks. It's just a matter of time-hang in there!

garywisbey

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 238
Reply with quote  #10 
hi hambone i all so have a shop on etsy toys seem to sell well and as liz said if you get the right person they will pay a good price for your toys if your in the uk theres also folksy have a shop on there as well but that is just for uk sellers i think you will just to try and see how you get on.
__________________
Gary Wisbey
https://www.etsy.com/shop/nobatteriesrequired
Doc

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 171
Reply with quote  #11 
G'day Wiley I think the short answer to your question is 'yes', but with provisions. For example: I own an Excalibur 21EX Variable speed or something and a single speed Hegner look alike from gazillions of years ago. I find what determines what works for you depends on what you want to do. As mentioned above, if you want to do intricate scrollwork and need to change blades or poke blades through tiny holes, then your machine must be capable of using pinless blades. If all you want to do is cut, for example, up to 12mm plywood or MDF then any quality pinned blade machine would do the job. Cheaper end machines tend to be limited in: 1. Quality - but not always a big deal, but you certainly get what you pay for so don't expect to spend all day cutting using a $150 (AUS) scroll saw 2. Sturdiness - some will vibrate like crazy off of your workbench or where ever it is set up 3. Repairability - spare parts aren't stocked/kept or may be so expensive that the machine may as well be treated as a disposable item - again, not necessarily a big issue 4. Speed limited - many only have a single speed - not actually a major problem for the most part but I use my variable speed quite frequently according to which timber I use 5. Thickness - the specs should tell you the maximum thickness you can cut on the machine. Again, even if it's only up to 19mm (3/4") it should be adequate for most toymaking, I would say. Personally, I think the blades are where all the money ends up - I use excellent quality scroll saw blades and can comfortably cut up to about 50mm (2") on my scroll saw. In that sense, a really good quality scroll saw with the right blade is as good as a band saw in some respects - I have a band saw too, but I think you get what I mean. Anyhoo, I'd better leave it there - I talk too much [wink]
__________________
Regards
Doc
Susan

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #12 
I agree with Doc - the blades are an important piece of the puzzle. The best scroll saw in the world is useless without quality blades. Every brand of blade cuts differently, so it really takes some trial and error to find the ones that suit you best. I personally like the pegas modified geometry ones. The same with the saw - each one has a different feel, so it is ideal to try out different brands if possible. And buy the best you can afford. St. Louis has a woodworking show each year where you used to be able to try out brands like Dewalt, PS Wood Machines and Hegner. However, it's been several years since any scroll saw manufacturers have participated. Best bet would be one of the Scrollsaw Picnics hosted each summer around the US.

As for selling on Etsy (oohlookitsarabbit), it does take a while to build up a customer base and steady sales. It took me 18 months to reach that point. I sell some large sets but find that having a mix of inexpensive and expensive items works well for me. I often only make part of the larger Toymakingplans sets too - I currently have parts of King Henry's castle in my store right now for example. I also don't rely entirely on toys for my sales, but  incorporate pendants, key chains, and whatever else I feel like making.
cynthia lewman

Avatar / Picture

Owner, ToymakingPlans.com
Registered:
Posts: 423
Reply with quote  #13 
I'd also add that Susan takes great photos of her toys in her Etsy shop so you may want to experiment with lighting and seamless backgrounds to highlight your work. Check out Susan's Etsy Shop: "Ooh Look, It's a Rabbit!"

Also, check out Gary Wisbey's England Etsy Shop. He also employs similar photo techniques as Susan and his store is growing daily: No Batteries Required
garywisbey

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 238
Reply with quote  #14 
i have to agree with susan with selling it would be nice just to sell the wood toys but i don't rely on just selling them you need to stock other items to sell as well some at a higher price and some lower. that way what ever budget the buyer has they might find something to buy.
__________________
Gary Wisbey
https://www.etsy.com/shop/nobatteriesrequired
sweetsaw

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #15 
You need to get a saw that will do what you want to do and in your price range. If things go good,   you can always up grade to a better saw. You can also sell things on face book.  Doyle [wave] 
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.