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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi Everyone

Last one I promise.

I made 2 sets of the Jake's Garage & Diner vehicles. These were a lot of fun and quite quick to make.

Thanks John for the free plans.

I wasn't able to cut 1.5 inch stock on my old scroll saw too well. 
It took me a couple of cars to settle in on the new scrollsaw.
I tensioned the blade up quite a bit so that it wouldn't bend at all and with a bit of technique improvement and practise, I managed to get quite straight and square cuts.

Timbers used are Pine for the body and Tassie Blackwood for the guards.
The tow hooks on the tow trucks are Jarrah.
All finished with the Butcher Block Conditioner Wax. 

That's it, back to work now.. ho hum.

IMG_1498.JPG  IMG_1499.JPG  IMG_1500.JPG  IMG_1502.JPG  IMG_1503.JPG  IMG_1504.JPG  IMG_1505.JPG  IMG_1506.JPG  IMG_1507.JPG  IMG_1508.JPG  IMG_1509.JPG  IMG_1511.JPG 

Cheers
Rod T


john lewman

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Reply with quote  #2 
These wood toy cars and trucks are a fine example of skilled workmanship. Thanks for posting the really beautiful photos. We all greatly appreciate it-and it is inspiring! Your finishing techniques and details are superb.
Bucko

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Well done Rod, all you're recent post show great work and a fine use of your holiday time in the shop. Thanks for all the post----
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #4 
You just raised the bar. These are wonderful.

When pine works it can really look good.


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BadBob

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Cutting thick stock is a real challenge. You have to cut a lot slower. Some of my playpal monster trucks are nearly 2 inches and made fro laminated oak and poplar. I had several that wound up being sanding blocks or trash.

Go slow. Don't push the blade.

Use new sharp blades. If you have any hint that the blade is getting dull change it.

Tape it. The tape has silicon on/in it that helps to lube the blade and cool it. Blue tape or packing tape will do.  I will not use anything but 3M tape. Scrollsaw blades are made from carbon steel if they get hot they get softer. dull, stretch and break.

I don't increase my tension. I set it to what the manufacturer says it should be. Ex21s once setup properly set the tension the same every time with just a flip of a lever.




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ctowne

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Reply with quote  #6 
When I put in a new blade I go through whatever I'm making and look for the thickest pieces first.  I cut in order of thickness.  It has helped me cutting the thicker pieces and the thinner pieces don't need a sharp so you can still get lots of miles out of your blades. 
BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ctowne
When I put in a new blade I go through whatever I'm making and look for the thickest pieces first.  I cut in order of thickness.  It has helped me cutting the thicker pieces and the thinner pieces don't need a sharp so you can still get lots of miles out of your blades. 


Excellent idea. I had not thought of that.

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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #8 
All good ideas and I mostly do all of that. 

Good idea Cindy, starting with the thicker pieces first. 

I have been using new blades on the 1.5inch bodies for the Jake's Garage cars. Once they start to struggle a bit I take the blade out and put it aside. I have been able to use these blades on thinner stocks later on.

It is so much easier to change blades on my new saw now, so I don't stress over changing them often. 
The new saw has a lot more torque than the old one. The old saw would just bog down and slow the cutting down, even with a new blade. The new saw just powers through, so I have learnt to back off a bit and just let the blade do the cutting. This produces a much better cut. 

Cheers
Rod T

Bucko

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Reply with quote  #9 
Good to read of your saw Rod, sure makes a build more enjoyable.
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