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Frankg

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi anyone experience leg numbness when scrolling a while. I'm talking about an hour or longer.

I use a stool when I sit and scroll. Any suggestions as to the proper height or position when scrolling a long job. Or scrolling in general?

Lately I've been experience numbness and I think my stool may be a bit to high.

Any advice is appreciated.!! 

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Cometoz

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Reply with quote  #2 
I tend to sit on a drafting stool - quite high so I can look down a bit on the work and my feet on the bottom rail. Since i have had a couple of DVT scares over the years I can wiggle my feet and keep some movement but tingling and numbness is not good according to my nursing wife!
I find with changing blades etc. I generally would have a break every 30mins or so. Would sometimes scroll for about 1-2 hrs no problem. I'll attach a pic of the sort of chair.
Take care or the body mate!!

T

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Iggy

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Reply with quote  #3 
Frank G.
             Tension can cause that as well, check yourself and relax more. I know I get carried away with it, I get into a good flow and press on and on and on. when I stop, my back hurts, my fingers and legs don't feel like a part of me any more. So I have 2 or three things going at once and stop every half hour or so get up and do something else that involves standing for a while and it helps.    

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jrlawjr

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Reply with quote  #4 
I used to have that problem sitting on drafting stools also.  My solution is the put a step stool or a box under my feet to raise my knees so I do not put pressure on the back of my legs.  So far it has helped me.  
kangaroopaws

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Reply with quote  #5 
I stand at the scroll saw and have no problems at all , I can also see my work better cannot sit to scroll at all have been for years doing this way
Frankg

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks guys for all your answers. I will have to decide my best option. At least I know this a normal thing to happen.

Kangeroopaws—— did you adjust the height of your saw to prevent hunching over. I like standing also but the work is a farther distance from my eyes. Especially small cuts.

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Frankg

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks Cometoz for the chair reference. Something for me to think about.
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Frankg

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Lggy—- I do the same. It does help. Not to crazy about that “floating” feeling when I get up.
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kangaroopaws

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Reply with quote  #9 
I am 5 foot 4 inches tall and my saw is 37,5 inches , that is to the work space ,  I do not have to hunch over it is perfect for me, so don't know about people of different height, never thought about it, when I got my saw someone gave me my table and it  worked out just right was not planed also can see my work perfectly so maybe accident. my table was not a scroll saw table at all was made for something else and the bloke was throwing it out
AES

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Reply with quote  #10 
I really do sympathise with you. Due to a long-standing (no pun intended) back injury I can't stand (or walk) for any longer than about 1 hour max.

I sit at my scroll saw, (also BTW, at my metal working lathe too) on an old height-adjustable office chair (not as posh as the one shown) which also has a back with adjustable angle. In addition, my saw is mounted on a table with the rear 2 feet about 1 inch higher than the front feet - i.e. the saw table is tilted very slightly downwards towards me. All this helps me, but even so I do find it necessary to stop and walk around for 5 mins after about an hour at the saw.

In addition I find it necessary to be very careful about the position of my backside (butt in US-speak?) as I first sit down at the saw (I need to get my spine pretty much flush against the back of the chair, which is sometimes easy to forget in the eagerness to get sawing!!!). AND I find it necessary to slightly change the angle of the back support from time to time - a lot depends on the size of the job I'm cutting out. AND I'm pretty much constantly varying the height of the chair by slight amounts. Again that seems to depend to a large extent on the size of the piece I'm cutting.

This is a question that crops up from time to time on another Forum that I frequent and the general consensus answer seems to be "exact height and position depends on the individual and it's a question of trial and error to suit you personally".

I'm not sure any of the above helps anyone else (as above, I've found these things are very much a question of each individual's physical condition) but hope a tip or too from the above list may help.

One thing I would say is that although I'm in no way medically qualified, from all I've learnt from my own condition over the years, if your legs are going numb you're either restricting the blood circulation to your legs to some extent, and/or a nerve is getting trapped somehow. You DO need to look at this PDQ otherwise if you just ignore it and a nerve IS involved then permanent damage could (maybe) result. Definitely NOT something to be taken lightly. DAMHIKT!

Sorry, I don't want to sound off all doom and gloom, but please do be careful.

Good luck

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AES

obxwoodtoys

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Reply with quote  #11 
I had back surgery and found that I need to change the height of my saw stand and stool it took time to find the right set up now i get lost and time goes by I would go to a doctor to get checked out.
Peter V

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Reply with quote  #12 
Frank,

I completely agree with AES about seeing a doctor.

I am working, standing upright. I lifted my table which I am working on, by putting the 4  tablelegs into 4 PVC-pipes of 1 meter (metric Europe). That made the upperside of the table working area at the exact right height for me, so I can have my elbows in 90 degrees (elbow in the kidney/side of my body).

My scrol saw the same and the newly bought tablesaw, and table-router I am intend to make those at such a height that I can control the sawing process from above, but ... all standing up right.

At my metal lathe, I also stand upright.

When I am sitting in my office (must do some work for a living) I have my chair at such a height that my upperlegs are 90 degrees to my torso, and my feet are flat at the ground. My laptop is almost to my belly when typing.

 

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AES

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Reply with quote  #13 
Frank,

Still NOT trying to be a "doom & gloom merchant" (honestly) but having had 3 back ops myself (the last one - I HOPE it was the last one! was in 2014) I'm glad other members here agree with my original post.

If none of the little tips and tricks about your position at the saw (and as an afterthought, I assume your saw is bolted down, so no undue vibrations, Yes/No?) then something somewhere in your body is trying to tell you something.


And again in my own experience, what someone above posted about your lower legs and feet flat on the floor is also very important. 

So you'll probably need to do a bit of "suck it and see" with all the above suggestions, but if none of those ideas help in your specific case then you really should see a doctor.

Good luck mate

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