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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #1 
Solid wood is out of the question. It would breakdown easy.

I'm thinking Baltic birch plywood but I can't buy it here.

DIY plywood I could do that. It would be a pain to make but it can be done. I ran across a jewelery box maker that made his own for drawer backs and bottoms. You can make any kind of plywood you want.

I'd like to hear anyone's thoughts on this. I'm planning to make some of the Quick N Easy WWII Fighter Planes and want to get this figured out before I start cutting.

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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #2 
Rather than a full plywood, could you glue just 2 pieces together with the grain running 90 degrees to each other and then cut out the propeller. 
Would this give enough strength?

Could look quite funky with a dark piece and a light piece glued together to make a feature out of it.

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #3 
Rod plywood is made with an odd number of layers to help prevent warping. If you use two plys there is a very good chance that you will windup with something that looks like a potato chip.


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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #4 
I just had an idea.

Make two 2 bladed propellers out of hardwood and "half lap" them. The joint would not need to be perfect just close enough. It's going to be covered by the hub any way.

What do you think?

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Bucko

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Reply with quote  #5 
Bob , the description you just stated is how the propeller is designed for the Table Saw Magic P-51 fighter offered on this site.

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Rod T

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Reply with quote  #6 
I see your point Bob.

the half lap option looks like the way to go.

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #7 
I spent a considerable amount of time researching plywood last night and came to the conclusion plywood isn't the answer to this question.

First, quality plywood just isn't available in small quantise for what I would consider a reasonable price. Yes, I can buy it in square foot pieces but with shipping costs make it cost $10 or more a square foot. A lot of the places selling the square foot pieces carefully avoid telling you the origin or grade of the plywood. I can get whole sheets. There are places the will cut down a sheet so it fits in a package shippable by UPS. Because it's big and heavy the shipping costs are way up there.

After much reading I pretty much came to the conclusion that to get really stable plywood you really don't want to use ply wood less than 1/2 inch thick. Yes, there are cases where its the best answer. Scrollsawing certain items for example.

So it looks to me like a half lap prop is absolutely the way to go and I'll probably go thicker than 1/8 inch. Half laping 1/8 inch would be like half laping popsicle sticks. If it looks to fat I can always thin the edges some.

Last night I filled up a bunch of shopping carts with plywood. Looking at plans and trying to figure out what I might need or want for the future. I'm big on buying large enough quantities of things I'm going to use to get the price down. I ran into this weight limit. You have to stay under about 75lbs or you wind up having to ship freight. That opens a whole nother can ow worms. A lot of them you don't know what it is goin to cost until the freight company tells you. Sometimes you don't know until they deliver it.

OK, it turns out that the best deal in what I would use are Europly project panels from Home Depot. I have to order them as they are not sold in stores. The shipping on two panels was $7.85. Europly is made in USA and its supposed to be as good as Baltic Birch. You can get full sheets of it special order at the pro desk. I'm going to give this a try since the next best bet is to drive 250 miles to a real plywood store.



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Tony

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Reply with quote  #8 
BadBob have you tried Micheals, I've bought packages with small pieces of plywood in different thicknesses. Here it is packaged as LARA'S CRAFTS WOOD RECTANGLES.
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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #9 
We don't have Michael's here.
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Tony

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Reply with quote  #10 

According to Michaels there's one here
1
1524 Governors Square Blvd
Governor's Market Place
TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301-3020
(850) 878-5622
Hours:
Mon : 9:00AM - 9:00PM
Tue : 9:00AM - 9:00PM
Wed : 9:00AM - 9:00PM
Thu : 9:00AM - 9:00PM
Fri : 9:00AM - 9:00PM
Sat : 9:00AM - 9:00PM
Sun : 10:00AM - 7:00PM

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #11 
Google maps says your right. It in an area I never go unless forced to. So I never saw it.

I looked at there web site. I didn't see any plywood.

I'm not much on wandering around in stores looking for stuff. I probably would not go there. I went to Hobby Lobby once after hearing someone rave about it. They had a 50% off sale on craft paint. I bought some only to discover that it was cheaper at Walmart at the regular price. I never went back.

I'm more of a order it and have some one drop it on my porch kind of shopper.

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griff2379

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hi Bob
There is a group in Cheshire,UK who make totally wooden clocks using veneers glued in rotation, giving a strength to each gear tooth by ensuring the correct grain gets to most of each tooth.
Try 4 veneers glued to each other at 45 degrees
calhanton

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Reply with quote  #13 
I usually use Tasmanian Oak for propellors and never use less than 8mm thick. This still looks great once you have feathered the edges and rounded the tips. I have a grandson who has broken many propellers flying through doorways, and whilst 10mm ply has stood up well, the Oak has not been broken yet. MDF life is measured in minutes even at 9mm.
Marlowes woodcraft

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Reply with quote  #14 
I haven't been on here for a while but in response to the 4 blade prop for the mustang I really like the    half lap solution and don't know why I didn't think of it. I have made many of the p 51 fighter and they are very popular at craft shows. 064.jpg 
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #15 
That is a very nice looking P-51.
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