Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Borg

Registered:
Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #1 

Just wondering if anyone mills their own logs? I have loads of various hard/softwoods and fruit wood and was going to cut them to 1 inch thick boards, are they likely to split while seasoning at this size? or is it best to leave them thicker for now? or indeed, can I work with them green ? I wouldn't like to spend ages making something then have it warp into something unrecognisable a few hours later.. as what usually happens when I make a bowl on the lathe..

Udie

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,179
Reply with quote  #2 
Borg - Take a look these two WTN's (Wood Toy News) articles and accompanying videos.
They just might interest you.

Free Wood from Fallen Trees.
and
How to Make Lumber with a Chain Saw - article.
How to Make Lumber with a Chain Saw - video.

I let my wood dry for 1 to 2 years.
I like to paint the ends to seal them, which prevents the ends splitting from winter snow/rain, etc.

Works for me.
Bucko

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 856
Reply with quote  #3 
On my cutting wood blanks for the lathe I've found fruit wood cracks often and easily. The end grain sealer is a must and the rule of thumb for drying is average of 1 yr for each inch of thickness. Nothing like learning from trying , go for it at 1" thick
Borg

Registered:
Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #4 
Ok cheers, im not very patient so i need to really get that moisture content down quicker, i might see a guy i know who has a kiln, if kiln dried is it likely to make the splitting worse? in which case is it best to dry the log before its milled or after?
Alaskan mills have their uses but never thought of using it for smaller stuff, thanks for that.
Udie

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,179
Reply with quote  #5 
Borg - Unfortunately I am not that knowledgeable about kiln drying wood or the process, so I can not really comment on the splitting issue. All I know is that storing the wood flat with spacers for air movement and painting the ends works for me and only mill them after a year or so.
Like you and many of our members, I purchase kiln dried wood from the big box stores.
Fortunately for me, there are a couple of mills within an hours drive which offer me great deals on Maple, Oak, Walnut, etc and great clean pine.
It might be worth your while to check out some local mills, believe me the quality is better and price is a lot cheaper than what the big box stores are charging.
You might be able to bring your wood to them and for a reasonable fee, they might be able to plane them down to the thickness you need and cut them to manageable lengths also.

Borg

Registered:
Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Udie, thanks, i try not to buy wood as i can get it very easily, i really like the idea of using local wood anyway but getting it to the correct thickness is a problem.
 I can mill easily enough but its what to do with it after that i need to think about, the last time i had some oak boards i gave to a local guy to plane for me, ended up messing up his blades with lumps of metal buried in the wood, i best not ask him again [wink]
I tried also hand planing but that must be a skill in itself as i was absolutely hopeless at it, just couldn't get it even across the board.
Will look for a cheap thicknesser and hopefully my fruitwood wont split too much.
Muskokamike

Registered:
Posts: 153
Reply with quote  #7 
Yeah, using a hand plane to flatter boards, you'll spend as much on a good smoothing plane as you will on a thickness planer. Lee Valley has a few that start at $239 that run up to over $300 for an 18"....I saw an antique 2 person smoothing plane go for $3500 at auction.....I'm not sure where you live Borg but on Kijiji here in Ontario you always see Dewalt and other planers selling for around $225 to $300 or $400 for the dewalt 3 blade 2 speed.....(refurb).


Just remember: if you don't want to throw out 3" off each end of your board, get one with a snipe lock on it....(if you don't know, snipe occurs when the carriage rides up on the board and the planer blades start planning slightly deeper than desired...leaving an area about 3" along the length that is thinner than the rest of the boards). The whole issue of snipe could be taken care of if the planer manufacturers would just put in better lifting and lowering mechanisms with less play in them.....my delta planer is about 8 years old and from new, the carriage would ride up over 1/8"....BRUTAL.....

Just remember too that you'll have to get one surface dead flat. You can take out small amounts of cupping by just skimming off 1/32" with the thickness planer but it doesn't get rid of warping or twists.....

BTW: that oak with the metal in it, it didn't happen to come from pallets did it? I warn everybody about using old pallets....they are MURDER on blades....just the grit alone will ruin most blades....
Udie

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,179
Reply with quote  #8 
This reply post is a little off the main topic but I decided to throw it in for fun.
Yep had that happened to me just this year - found a bullet in a piece of Walnut from the saw mill.
1 Walnut Plank.jpg
Lucky for me, the lead did not damage my blades.
Click on the photo for a closer look.

Borg

Registered:
Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #9 
Muskomamike, im in the UK but there seems to be a lot of Dewalts here, they do seem to hold their value though so I will probably end up with a cheapo far-east one, false economy probably but I don't intend to sell any toys, its purely a hobby but im guessing many people here would have said that in the start too, we will see. I will keep an eye open for a higher end second hand one though, thanks for the tips  [smile]
The oak wasn't a pallet no, i think the metal started life as a horseshoe, the chainsaw missed it, band saw missed it but the planer got it, i have a metal detector so i will try scanning the boards next time, might work.
Udie, i like that, i love Walnut and that feature really adds something to it, i have one similar, an oak with loads of buckshot in it, i left them in, varnished it and its now a shelf. What are the chances of a saw cutting right through them, I always wondered the story behind it, who shot it, when and why.
Is yours a musket ball ? it puts me in mind of that old urban tale about the bullet in the tree and the dynamite.

Muskokamike

Registered:
Posts: 153
Reply with quote  #10 
It depends on where you get your wood what you find in it...I've read about (recently) a civil war flintlock/musket found in a tree....what happened was a soldier leaned his rifle against the tree then probably was shot......the tree grew around the rifle....

If you're in the southern US, mini balls would be pretty common since so many were fired and the guns weren't that accurate.....
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.