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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #1 
I see people interchangeably using the terms model and toy. I've seen people call scrollsawn animal cutouts models and elaborate builds with hundreds of tiny parts toys. Perhaps this is just a language thing that I don't know about. However, I am curious.
 
At what point do you think a toy becomes a model?
 
If it is easily broken, it is not a toy or perhaps poorly designed or built. For example, dropping it on the floor breaks the toy. All my toys that have wheels on them get drop tested by my grandson. Wooden dinosaurs always seem to be getting into fights. Occasionally, one gets hammered on the concrete floor.
 
If it has many small, easily breakable detailed parts, it is not a toy.
 
What do you think?

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AJ

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Reply with quote  #2 
G'Day,
In Australia toys have a lot tighter restrictions than Models, That may explain why some hand made wooden toys here (especially at markets ) are sold as models.
All the Toys I make are toys and like you if it is made to play with it needs to be sturdy and safe.
One of the women who I supply to for her permanent Saturday stall has two young boys who love to come and visit when she is picking up stock, if I have a new design or change an old one I like the boys to have a play with them, Their reaction to the toy and their comments also give me an indication of how other children will react to the toy and also give some indication on how popular they will be.
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Reply with quote  #3 
Good Morning, to me a toy is something to be played with, to be able to take some rough treatment and is solidly built, like the playpal set for example, if it gets broke it's not the end of the world. personally, I like some small imperfections that show it was made by me by hand and not just machined.

A model on the other hand, is something like the items made by Udie, with intricate parts that are very likely to get damaged with rough play, and look great displayed.

From the work I have seen from you BadBob, you could call what you make either category, the finishing looks that good to me.

Best wishes from the UK, Nick
Peter V

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hello Folks,

it all depends with age.

let me try to explain .... (little) children benefit the most of sturdy things to play with.
When they become older, they start to appriciate (more) delicate things to play with and are more aware of the fact that things can break. (bec ause often more details). 

Grown-ups (like we) make toys which sometimes can be(come) displayed items, for us they are then toys, right? Even when those are made particularly for displaying.





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To me, the question of Model vs Toy comes down to the level of realism of the object.
 ie how accurately it represents the full sized object.
 
You could scale up a Play Pals car/truck/van all you like , it will never look the same as something that exists in real life.  It is thus a Toy.

On the other hand, many of the trucks available on Aschii's Workshop site  are Very detailed and the dimensions of the parts are scaled down from the real thing, maintaining proportions. This necessarily makes them more fragile, as wood is not steel, so whilst one could (carefully) play with them, they are more accurately called Models.

Whilst a few of John's creations  take design cues from the real thing, they are simplified for ease of construction and ruggedness, and thus are in the great majority, simply Toys.

Which is just the way I like it!


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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #6 
I make pretty toys that people buy to put on a sheld and look at. 

Now they are decorations?


20181215-153110  Handmade Wooden Toy Car Bad Bob's Custom Motors Group.jpg 


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john lewman

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Reply with quote  #7 
Beautiful work, BadBob!
BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lewman
Beautiful work, BadBob!


Thanks, John


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Grandpa Bear

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Hi Bob, great cars, do you paint fenders before attaching to vehicles? These are very eye catching lovely finish, Nick
BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa Bear
Hi Bob, great cars, do you paint fenders before attaching to vehicles? These are very eye catching lovely finish, Nick


Yes, I painted the fenders before assembly. I masked them with a strip of blue painters tape on the fender and the body. I drilled a small hole in the fender and glued a piece of the bamboo skewer in it for a handle. I made the fenders out of pine. They were tough to sand without breaking them but were fine after I glued them in place. If I make more, I am going to rethink how I did this. I'll use hardwood or plywood for the fenders.

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AES

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Reply with quote  #11 
To me there's a distinct difference between a toy and a model. That a "toy" is robust enough to be played with by a young child (or even baby) is only part of the toy definition IMO.

A couple of people above have already captured the difference well IMO - a model has a distinct, measureable, relationship to an original item - e.g. ALL dimensions are at, say, 1/8th scale. A toy MAY come close to that in some respects, in so far as there's a "proportional relationship" between the toy and a similar real-world item, but there are no/very very few  actual scaled dimensions.

Of course this gets more difficult if you talk about something which does not yet exist in the real world (e.g. a space ship), but a quick visit to the IPMS web site will show some of their space models and clearly these are NOT items you'd happily put into the hands of a young child to play with.

If you want an example of what is, IMO, a "real model" and not a toy, look on this Forum, for the posts by member "Dalboy" who shows a model of a German WWII truck. I GUESS that member MAY be willing to give that model to an older child (a teenager say) but more likely it'll end up on some adult enthusiasts desk or show case - i.e. it's a model and is not to be played with.

But I wonder why we bother about this distinction (unless, as already said above, it's a question of commercial sales and accompanying regulations - e.g. Health and Safety)?

Personally I do not make for sale, but simply for my own pleasure, so it doesn't bother me much. I make according to what I believe are the "capabilities" of the recipient. I usually just give away the results afterwards - perhaps with a donation towards material costs - 'cos let's face it, at my working "speed" you'd have to be a millionaire to buy one of my things, even if I only charged labour at a dollar an hour!!!! ;-)

My take, if it's of any help at all.

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I have enjoyed and learned from all of the comments on this post. It is a well thought and civil conversation. Thank you to all.
BadBob

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Do you drop test your toys?

That doesn't seem to be an on-topic question, but I found someone who does this with his toys. It's an interesting idea.

If you can drop it from waist height to a concrete floor without breaking, it's a toy if it breaks its a model.

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BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lewman
I have enjoyed and learned from all of the comments on this post. It is a well thought and civil conversation. Thank you to all.


I started a similar conversation in another group where what I would consider toys is pretty rare. They post mostly intricate pieces. Some make wheels that have more parts than any of my toys in one wheel. 

I make toys sometimes that parents will not let their kids play with the toys. The first cars I made for my grandson are sitting in my office at work because Odin's grandmother and my daughter would not let him play with them. They were too pretty.

Similarly, when I was making a lot of Norm Marshal toys. I sent some to my nephew. My sister would not let him play with them. The last I saw one it was sitting on a high shelf. I guess that it is still there. I kept some of those and 30 years later Odin has them. He plays with them but treats them like royalty compared with other toys.
 
The thing that got me thinking about this was SEO. I had a suggestion that I use the word 'model' as a keyword in an Etsy shop listing description. It was for a dinosaur. That got me thinking, what makes it a model.  From what I see others posting, its a very grey area. Like beauty, it's in the eye of the beholder.

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chapmanrm

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Reply with quote  #15 
All great answers, scale to me is very important with compromises for strength and consideration of your target market age. I like to personalize toys with names etc or add small details like pallets and scale lumber or boxes.

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