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Davy

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Reply with quote  #1 
I downloaded the "Five full size wood toy plans" (cars and truck). They are great, I made two sets and want to make more, however I would like to paint them i bright colors by dipping them.
Any suggestions on what type of paint and method will work?
Udie

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Reply with quote  #2 
Welcome Davy: Interesting idea. I have not tried that. I would be very interested to hear if any one on the Forum has tried that. Do you thin the paint and do multiple coats, I do not know. OK Forum Community, who has done that?
Udie
cynthia lewman

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Davy,

Below is a simple paint dipping method we use at toymakingplans.com. This topic would make for a good video. We'll add that to our list of videos to make!

Paint Dipping Method:
1. We like to use water-based brush-on acrylic latex semi gloss house paints sold in a can. They come in a wide variety of colors. You can also use Krylon Color Creations in a can.

2. Find a bucket that's at least 3 times as deep as the toy part you will be dipping.

3. Pour the paint in the bucket and thin with an equal amount of water. The paint/water mixture needs to adequately cover the part when dipping it. You won't want to go too deep with your paint/water mixture since you need room in the bucket for the toy to hang after is been dipped.

4. Use a stiff wire such as a coat hanger to dip the part. For toy car bodies make a hook that goes through the drilled wheel axles. The other end of the wire should be bent to adequately hook over the piece of wood you'll make in Step 5. For dipped toy parts that don't have holes we use a staple gun to place a staple on the bottom of the toy or in an inconspicuous place. The staple must be securely in the toy and also allow enough room to slip the wire hook through.

5. Find a narrow scrap piece of wood that's 4" longer than the diameter of the bucket and is about 3/4" square. The wood strip will be laid horizontally across the bucket top and used to hook the dipping wire over each time you dip the toy.

6. With the toy part hooked to the wire, dip the part into the bucket, covering it completely. Use the dipping wire to raise the part slowly and completely out of the paint. Next, place the wood strip across the top of the bucket and hang the toy to the wood strip using the wire. The toy part should be hung completely out of the paint. 

7. Allow time for the paint to drain off the toy until the paint has stopped dripping. This usually takes a minute or so. Use a small stick or artist's paint brush to carefully wipe the remaining drips hanging to the bottom of the part. With practice you can do this without the drip points showing.

8. Let the part dry thoroughly. This can be sped up using a box fan. A box fan is necessary if painting in a high humidity environment.

9. You'll see that the paint dipping will cause the nap of the wood (fuzzies) to stand up. When the paint is bone dry use 220 grit sand paper to smooth the surface for the second coat of paint.

10. Repeat Step 9 until you have achieved the level of smoothness and depth of color you desire. This is usually 3-4 coats, sanding between coats and not sanding the last coat.
IMPORTANT: Many bright colored acrylic latex paints are semi-transparent. One way you can cancel out the transparency is by adding white acrylic latex paint at a ratio of one part white to ten parts color (1:10). This will lighten the color a little, but will make it opaque. Another method for obtaining good results with semi-transparent paints is too dip the first and second coat using the white acrylic latex paint as a primer, at the same water to paint ratio (1:1) in Step 3. After priming, the toy is then dipped in the unmodified transparent color for 3-4 coats, sanding between coats and not sanding the last coat.

11. For a super high gloss finish after dip painting and finishing, first let the toy part dry until bone dry. We like to use Krylon Triple Thick Clear in a spray can. Apply 3 light coats sanding the first two coats when dry with 400 grit sandpaper. Apply 1-2 final coats Krylon Triple Thick Clear without sanding. NOTE: Any Krylon or Rust-Oleum spray can gloss clear will work well. We prefer the Krylon Triple Thick Clear because it's a thick deep clear coat that is very glossy.
Udie

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Reply with quote  #4 
Cynthia: Another excellent post. To experiment with this and keep the initial cost down for your first try. Go to your local big box store or local paint stores and purchase a can of their 'Opps' paint. Opps paints are paints where the attendant has accidently put the tints in the wrong base, or returned cans from customers or mixed paints which were rejected by the customer for what ever reason. They are usually sold for 1/4 of the original cost around $10-12 for a gallon and $5-7 for a quart. There is nothing wrong with paint, it just was not the original color intended. For decades I have been using outdoor and indoor Latex Opps paints for many of my projects.
Udie
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #5 

Hi Davy

You just saw the best reason to be part of the forum in Cynthia's response.  All you have to do is ask around here.  John and Cynthia have done it all and know most of the tricks and love to help the rest of us.

I would ask where you live Davy?
Because the weather where you are can make all the difference to any paint method you use.

I live in in Santa Maria, CA and paint outside all year around.  My biggest challenge is the wind, because I spray paint using Krylon and 
Rust-Oleum paints as Cynthia referred to in her article.

I like to spray because I use the paint I need, and the Krylon in inexpensive.

If you cannot spray paint because of weather, you can use an Acrylic paint like Delta's Creamcoat. You can buy this paint in any craft store.  I love this stuff because it dries so fast and is easy to apply.  By the time you paint a few parts you can buff it out and reapply another coat.  Note:  I thin my paint just a little bit with water, just a little; this makes the paint flow on much smoother. This paint works great because although it dries to a dull finish you will be amazed how easy it is to get it to shine.  After painting use a synthetic pad or 0000 grade steel wool between coats, AND even after the final coat buffing very lightly, and the paint will begin to shine.  A coat or two of Krylon Triple Thick Clear and like Cynthia said in her article and you will be very well pleased.

I even water this paint down 50/50 with water and use as a stain.  Want to stain you bear wood product purple?  No problem, just water it down to your liking and brush on heavy and wipe off, wait to dry and apply Cynthia's Beeswax/Mineral Oil paste and you are done.  See the how to section to see a video by Cynthia on how to make your own Beeswax/Mineral Oil wax.  This is a great way to finish plain wood or even painted and clear coated projects because it reduces the fingerprints left by the little toy demons.

Just a few ideas.

Glad you are with us.


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Davy

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Ken,
I live in the Denver area and thanks for your advice.
Like you. I started making toys for two grand boys 3 and 5.
When I left Michigan 3 years ago I sold my very complete shop thinking I would live in an apartment. And so I did, but I found a complex with a great community wood shop with a paint room.
Now a couple questions:
1. Do you undercoat raw wood before spraying Krylon?
2. What do you use to hold the toy while spraying? I've sprayed cars and larger things, but little toys? I envision a rotating holder, spin it and spray.
Thanks for the post,
Jim Davy


Udie

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Reply with quote  #7 

Jim  (Davy): We have got a Rotating Paint/Spraying Table article and video which may interest you. I have attached the links to each.
http://www.toymakingplans.com/website/how-to/rotating-turntable-for-painting-wood-toy-parts.html
and
http://www.toymakingplans.com/website/News/07-23-13_Wood-Toy-News.pdf
These articles/videos and much more can be found in two (2) locations on this web site.
Go to the 'Wood Toy Workshop' tab, an that takes you to Tips, Techniques and How-To's for Toymakers and 'Wood Toy News (WTN)' is  list of all the WTN's issued which also includes instructional articles/videos and shows the work of many talented toy makers.
Enjoy
Udie


papabrett

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Reply with quote  #8 
If you are looking for paint and you have a recycling center a lot of times you can get it for free. I picked up some "Old Master" brand the last time I went. Though I didn't pick up any paint at the time there was no shortage of choices.
papabrett

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Reply with quote  #9 
Are there any issues with glue up? I suck with painting so would be nice to have a good way to have sharp separate colors
Udie

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Reply with quote  #10 
papabrett: In my article/video about the Top Gun Aircraft Carrier I mention a product called Frog Tape and it is great for just what you are looking for. Starts on page 18, here's the link. http://www.toymakingplans.com/website/News/01-19-14_Wood-Toy-News.pdf
Hope it helps with some painting applications.
Udie

Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Davy

You have gotten a lot of great advice here.

I use a rotating base then put a piece of scrap wood on top of it, I have drilled lots of holes in the wood to hold different dowel parts and axle pegs so I can paint the ends.

I also use those cheep BBQ sticks you can buy in the grocery stores.  You can get a bunch in a bag for a couple of bucks.  I like to lay parts on them so the parts are not flat on the table when spray painting.
When I am priming i can reuse the sticks as long as i want, but when painting I use new ones when i first turn the painted surface down on a stick.  Helps to keep the primer on the stick from sticking to your new paint job.

Udie told me about sharping dowels in a pencil sharpener to make points, then you can put them point up on your board and hold parts on the points.  This works great for painting wheels, as you can paint one side then turn over and paint the other side and the only part touching anything is the axle hole.

If a part is so small the spray might blow it away, you can use blue tape doubled over, or double sided tape on a board and apply your small parts to the tape.  Then turn over when dry and do the back side.
Be careful using this method not to over spray the parts. 

Just a couple of ideas that might help.

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Davy

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Reply with quote  #12 
Davy on PAINT DIPPING
Thanks for all the information. MY LATEST FIND:
For small toy cars I used GENERAL FINISHES PolyCryl Semi Gloss, diluted 30% water. After completely submerging I hung them on a string using a paper clip and let them drip. after 5 minutes wipe off the drip on the lower most part. Once the wheels are dry, about 15 minutes, rotate the wheels to preserve rotating. Your end up with a nice professional finish. A second coat just enhances the nice finish.
Now I'm looking for a paint that will perform the same way that will present a nice opaque color with only two coats..
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #13 
Davy

I would love to see photos of how your toys are coming out.  Never even thought of doing wheels this way.  Good Idea.

Thanks

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Kenneth W Martin
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