Francois
Hello,

I have seen several videos where toymakers use the Krylon Color Creations series of paints (or any other series of bright paints) and I tried unsuccessfully to find these.  I would like to know if someone could tell me if this series of paints is still available and where I could get it.

I started using the spray paint Color Master series but I don't like using sprays. To me it is wasteful and expensive and you have to be peoperly setup[ to do it properly.

I live in Canada but the US border is less than a day's drive and if I can find some there, to me it would be worth the drive.

Can someone please tell me where I could find he Krylon Color Creations set of brush on paints or recommend equivalents.

Thank you,

François
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BadBob
The only place I could  find Color Creations paint was eBay. You might try a Sherwin Williams paint store. Sherwin Williams is the parent company for Krylon.
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Francois
Thank you Bob,
I will research this. Other than this series of paints, can you tell me what toymakers typically use for brush painting bright toys?
Francois
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BadBob
Francois wrote:
Thank you Bob,
I will research this. Other than this series of paints, can you tell me what toymakers typically use for brush painting bright toys?
Francois


Acrylic paint. Lots of people are using craft paint. I use house paint and craft paint.
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Greg
I don't use spray paints very much because of the over spray issues and my health  but occasionally when I do use it  I have been getting my Krylon paints at Canadian Tire 
For a while they didn't carry it but it is back on the shelves

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Shortstack
Check out this YouTube selection:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+decant+spray+paint

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BadBob
Shortstack wrote:
Check out this YouTube selection:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+decant+spray+paint



I don't think this would work for brush painting. Rattle can paints are thinned and designed for spraying they are probably to thin for brushing.

I would not do this simply because every rattle can paint I have read the label on mentions brain damage. Maybe that's just me needing all the brain cells I have. 

A good paint store can hook you up with about any kind of paint you might want in just about any color you might want. In quantities as low as 8 ounces. Complete with brain cell killing volitol solvents if that is what you want. 


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Shortstack
Decanting is used, mostly, by folks who will use that paint for airbrushing some item or other.  Dual-control airbrushes are an excellent tool for painting and detail work and doesn't take long to get used to using.  As for the thinness of the paint, just let it sit uncovered for a while and let the solvents evaporate until the consistency is to your liking.  As for "brain killing" solvents, shouldn't you be using a painter's mask even when brushing? 

An excellent source for fantastic color selections is AutoAirColor and their sister company, Createx.  They produce vibrant, snappy colors that can be intermixed to produce your own tints and "flavors".  AND, the paints are waterborne and not solvent based and use air movement to "dry" instead of heat.  The only solvent based coating needed is the clear coat you'd put on last as a gloss, matte, or flat   This is the system that I plan to use on my pickup and car when I finish their bodywork.
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BadBob
I don't brush anything with brain cell killing solvents and rarely use rattle can paints. Then only outside with me upwind from what I'm spraying. I just happened to have read the product safety data sheet for the paint I use this morning.  It talks about getting it in your eyes. ingesting, getting it on your skin and inhaling the paint. Nothing in there about volatile vapors eating your brain cells. Under protective clothing masks are not even mentioned. So no I don't need to wear a mask when I'm painting with a brush. 

I have a respirator I use for the nasty stuff when I do spray some. 

I would not decant from a rattle can because if anything goes wrong this stuff is going to go everywhere. I suppose having a family member who worked in hazardous waste disposal for years might shape my view just a little. 


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Shortstack
Since I was a bodyman working in the bodyshop of a large trucking company, and using Dupont paint system materials, I know how to handle hazardous paints. Varithane (2 part apoxie ) primer and Emron ( 2 part color coat ), so I am aware FIRST HAND of the dangers of some of those vapors.  That is why I suggested paints from AutoAirColor that have no volital ingredients and have more color choices that one can count.  That includes flip-flop paints, florescent colors, candies, and pearls.  They have one paint named Hot Rod Sparcle that is a fine metal flake material that reflects the color of the color coat it is mixed with or when it is used as a top coat.  All of the color lines can be shot through an airbrush, touch-up gun, and full sized paint gun.   I have no connection to this company other than a future customer when I get my full sized truck and car read to paint in my backyard.  Their spec. sheet can be downloaded free from their website.

Now, my last comment on this subject in this thread is this.....HOPEFULLY no one is contemplating using any paints with volatile materials on toys.  HOPEFULLY,  they will stick with the safe craft paints and maybe even check out the waterborne paint system I've been mentioning.  If I ever decided to decant some paint from a spray can ( or any other materials such as WD-40 ) I will use a kit for installing an ice maker for a refrigerator.  I would attach the clamp with the piercing pin to the can, close to the bottom, then run the plastic line out for about 5 feet and into a safe container.  Standing the can upright, would put the gas into the top of the can where it could force out the paint from  that tap close to the bottom.  If the ice maker tap can seal out the water pressure for our homes, it can surely seal out the paint and pressurizing gas from a spray can.  THIS is the decant method that is the safest of all.  Those who put a hose on the spray can's nozzle are just looking for trouble.


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mlusk123
1927 Vintage Bi Plane painting.  Can anyone suggest how to paint the parts of the body. I guess you can not paint them before you glue them, so they have to be painted separate or wait till you get it all together to paint it? 

Thanks...Michael

Michael Lusk
Springfield, Tn. 
Disabled Vet Woodworking Hobbyist



 
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Bubba
BadBob wrote:


Acrylic paint. Lots of people are using craft paint. I use house paint and craft paint.


If craft paint was used, and the child puts the toy in the mouth and chews it, wouldn't the paint get dissolved (and maybe to the mother's horror color the child's mouth)? How would you prevent that from happening? 
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john lewman
craftpaintts.jpg 

This is the type of craft paint that I use. There are several brands available online and at Michael's, Blick's and Hobby Lobby. All are non-toxic and safe for toys. Just be sure that the container says it is acrylic crafts paint. An enormous selection of colors and even metal flake is available. It is a very durable finish.
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Bubba
Thank you John.  
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Bubba
john lewman wrote:
craftpaintts.jpg 

This is the type of craft paint that I use. There are several brands available online and at Michael's, Blick's and Hobby Lobby. All are non-toxic and safe for toys. Just be sure that the container says it is acrylic crafts paint. An enormous selection of colors and even metal flake is available. It is a very durable finish.


I tried this and it worked beautifully. The finish is satin and it seems durable, even after sanding, however I'd still like to seal it. Do you have any suggestions on what sealer to use?
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