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ctowne

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi All - First, you all are so great and give excellent tips.  I am not the best at painting but does anyone have tips on painting stripes or dots.  Specifically for little animals like a black and white cow or a zebra.  I have avoided this on some things by cutting the animal apart at the different animal colors.  I can't do it with a zebra or cow too many pieces.   I would guess you put the light color on first then the dark on top.  Does anyone have some helpful hints.
Cindy
pdaunno

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Reply with quote  #2 
Great question Cindy. Typically a dark color will cover a light color better than the other way around. I'm a novice painter and look forward to the responses from those more experienced. In particular I'd like to know what the best tape to use for painting stripes. It would add a lot of character to the cars and trucks I'm working on now.
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Udie

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Reply with quote  #3 
Cindy and pdaunno - Great questions, let's see if my 2-cents helps.

Painting stripes ... Frog Tape (Yellow) - This special tape eliminates paint bleed under the tape that you would normally get when using common painter tape. Here are a couple links you can go on the Forum and this web side to see it in use and the results:
Top Gun Aircraft Carrier WTN and video.
Page 19 shows the tape and continues to page 21 to the results.
The article also discusses and demonstrates using Automotive self-adhesive Pin Strips on page 23.
Peterbilt Trailer - Udie's Progress
Here I demonstrate using Green Frog Tape.
Udie's Peterbilt Trailer Mod - Flavour #1 - Tanker Trailer
Here you can see the use of the Automotive Pin Strips at the beginning of the article and at the end.
Metallic Pin Stripes - finger nail decorating pin strips.
Trailers for Play Pals - How to Make 4 types
The attached PDF in this post shows the tapes used and results on page 12.

Dots
Member JohnKC demonstrates results using the opposite side of the paint brush to make dots.
Great for making eyes.
Create Little People Facial Expressions

Member Gary Pace uses a similar technique in his two posts when he built his 'b train.
For making details such as rivets and wheel nuts.
b train I'm building
B train tractor trail 2

Member Ken Martin shows us a labour of love when he camouflages his Nato Tank Carrier.
Nato Tank Carrier
I guess we will have to ask Ken to expand on how he did this.

Member joepeto also posted a wonderful camouflage jeep in:
Army, Navy and Desert Jeeps

A visit to your local hobby shop just might be another source for information, techniques and a source of special tapes used by the model builders when adding strip details to their projects.

Might be a good idea to use the net, for example YouTube and search painting techniques using different brushes and brush strokes. I found watching videos made by Donna Dewberry very informative and have acquired a lot of techniques from her.

Now, jumping off topic a little, how about stickers and labels etc.
Take a look at post #13, where at the end discusses exactly that.
Peterbilt Trailer Udie's Complete Project Photos.

Hope some of this helps.
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #4 
Cindy

With the type of painting you are talking about it seems the best way is to go freehand, especially for the zebra.

You could use an automotive pin strip tape they use for painting pin strips because this tape is somewhat flexible.  It would take a lot of stripping to do a zebra.

For dots I have seen people use the handle end of the paint brush to make different size dots depending on how big the handle is.

A friend makes small circles by using the end of a straw.  So if she wants an eyebrow over an eye she will just dip 1/2 of the end of the straw in the paint and this leaves a half circle.

When painting freehand strips you will want to do dry brush painting so you don't leave a lot of paint ridges along the edges from extra paint on the brush.  This just takes some practice to get used to the fact that you are carrying almost no paint on the brush at all.  When you wet the brush you wipe off almost all the paint then paint your strip.  This requires a lot of trips to get new paint on the brush because you are carrying so little paint.

One great source of really small quality paint brushes is the beauty supply store.  Go to the nail section and you will find some of the smallest paint brushes you have ever seen.

Another thing is some colors will not cover very well, even darker colors, and will need a second coat.  I found this to be the case when hand painting the Nato Tank Carrier with the camo look.  The dark brown needed a second coat.  What a pain.

Note when painting.  Each coat will need the same sanding and buffing as any coat of paint to make the final product look really smooth.  The camo paint job on the Nato Tank Carrier was the best use of the synthetic buffing pads ever, because they did not mess with the undercoats much.

I think the best answer is going to be using an airless paint gun.  I have tried and the learning curve was so big I quit trying when my old gun malfunctioned.  They say you can paint anything with one of those, but I just never have taken the time to learn.

I hope someone here has some better ideas, because I would love to learn how to do a better job when painting things like you are talking about.

Good luck and I really am looking forward to seeing your results.  I know you will come up with something, because you are one of the most resourceful people I have meet.

Lets hear from the good painters out there.

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ctowne

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks all for the tips and videos to watch.  I will check these out.  Good points on painting with not paintbrushes,  the straw for eye brows.  Some more opportunities to think outside the box.  Winter is a good time for this harder intricate painting.  Hopefully I will have something to post before Christmas. 
Cindy
Ken Martin

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Reply with quote  #6 
Cindy

Udie reminded me about using decals for creating unique effects on wood.

I have used water slide decals a number of times and they work really well.

I have bought water slide decal paper from Micro-Mark http://www.micromark.com and Evens Designs at http://www.ModelTrainSoftware.com and both have worked well.

You could go to the web and find a zebra strip pattern you like copy it to your computer, then just print it out on water slide decal paper and apply the pattern to the side of you project.
Papers come in Clear and White so you might want to try a simple pack first before investing in a lot of paper.

Note: Sometimes if you are trying to use light colors on your decal over a dark painted toy it might not work so well.  Like I tried to use yellow lettering on decal paper and apply it over a black toy.  The black just showed right through.

This might be a worth while idea to play around with, because you can print almost anything from your computer to the decal paper.
With most papers they require a sealer over the printing to seal the ink.  Some companies have their own sealers they want you to buy, but you don't need them.  I just use Krylon Triple-Thick Crystal Clear Glaze because I already have that product for finishing toys.
Photo below shows an image I copied off a business card for a construction co. to put their logo on a toy back hoe I was making for them. DSC05942_mini.JPG 
I sprayed the printed decal with the Krylon Clear Glaze.  Note the blue tape is just to keep the spray from affecting the rest of the paper, so I can use it again.
I found I could not use this image because it was to big and bulky looking for where I wanted to put it, and the black color of the toy shown Thur the decal.
So I made a sign using Word Art on the computer and printed the sign you see below on plain paper(because I did not have any white decal paper) and then applied it to the boom arm of the Back Hoe with 3M Spray Adhesive like you might apply a pattern when getting ready to scroll saw something.
Then we covered it with the Krylon Triple-Thick Crystal Clear Glaze.
DSC05927_mini.JPG  This was not a perfect answer, but the client loved it.

Just some ideas about using decals.  You can create anything you can print on your computer to cover the sides of your toys.

Share you final results with us.


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pdaunno

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Udie
Cindy and pdaunno - Great questions, let's see if my 2-cents helps.

Painting stripes ... Frog Tape (Yellow) - This special tape eliminates paint bleed under the tape that you would normally get when using common painter tape. Here are a couple links you can go on the Forum and this web side to see it in use and the results:
Top Gun Aircraft Carrier WTN and video.


Thank you for the suggestion on the yellow frog tape.  I have some of the green frog tape but haven't tried yellow.  I see that the yellow is for freshly painted surfaces which is very likely to be the way in toy making.  I'll give it a try!

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