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bl_smith25

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Reply with quote  #16 
Thanks BadBob. I’m also being told to trace the image onto the wood using carbon paper. Have you tried that and how did it work? I’ve got a bunch of it and some little tracer styli without various sized balls on the end depending on the thickness of lines you want.

Going back to the paper again, won’t the blue tape mess up the blade as it cuts?

So, you can make one with the paper pattern, then trace out subsequent ones using the first wooden one, assuming it’s good?
Guess I’ll stop using up my card stock then and just use paper.

I’m not following your last sentence about using templates before computers? I’m using the computer of course to get templates to print them out. I thought this was the way it was done as I’ve seen in many YouTube videos.

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Peter V

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Reply with quote  #17 

B.L.,

the blue painters tape act as a kind of grease while cutting, the running of the blade is more smooth.

Template before computer-era >> one used to get the printed plan onto a kind of triplex and than used that piece as (a kind of permanent) "drawing", to take the contours, windows and location of the axle-holes etc.

Somewhere in one of the messages on the forum, there are examples to see. That method is handy when making (a lot of the same) objects. 

Nowadays you can print as many copies via the computer and cutting  by hand or, using the computer as a CNC-cutter (see posting #6), doing it that way.


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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #18 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bl_smith25
Thanks BadBob. I’m also being told to trace the image onto the wood using carbon paper. Have you tried that, and how did it work?


Yes, I have tried carbon paper. It's messy and hard to remove from the wood. It ruins your pattern and is not suitable for making lots of toys.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by bl_smith25
Going back to the paper again, won’t the blue tape mess up the blade as it cuts?


No, the tape lubricates the blade. The tape has a bit of silicon in the top layer that keeps it from sticking together in the roll. The tape also helps to prevent tear-out or fuzzies along the edge of the cut.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bl_smith25
I’m not following your last sentence about using templates before computers?


I have been making toys, and other scroll saw projects off and on for many years. In the before time, before computers, plans were in books or magazines. I had to trace them or draw them on graph paper from a reduced size drawing. Making these drawings was a time-consuming process. Using the drawing as a cutting pattern by gluing it to the wood destroyed the pattern. If I wanted to make more than one, I made a template. I used hardboard (masonite) or plastic laminate to make my templates.  

If you had access to a copier, you could make as many copies as you needed and even change the size.

Computers and scanners were a game-changer. I could scan the image from a book or magazine. Once the pattern was in the computer, I could edit it, resize and print as many copies as I needed. Bit maps graphics were a pain to deal with, but they were a significant improvement over pencils.

Today we have vector graphics (SVG) and can produce high-quality paper patterns in any size or quantity we need. I usually don't use the pattern directly from the plans. I will first convert them to SVG and make my own. As an example, when I print the Play Pal VW Bug pattern, I get ten of them on a sheet.  If I want to make a car as big as a 2x4, it takes less than a minute to create the pattern and print it. The ability to rapidly change sizes is wonderful for puzzles. I can size the pattern to fit the wood I have.

The software I use is Inkscape and Gimp. Both programs are free opensource software.

I highly recommend you get a copy of "Scroll Saw Workbook, 3rd Edition".






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Wombat

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Reply with quote  #19 
Hi bl_smith25

When I first started, I too was hung up about saving "the pattern".
Don't be, it is a one-use tool. You printed one, you can print more.
Anything you do to "copy" from the pattern , eg carbon paper, pricking with a pin etc, will produce an inferior result, take longer and only save the cost of a printed sheet of paper.

Instead of Blue-tape, I use clear packaging tape and spray-on glue to attach the paper pattern.  Same result.

 If you feel you really must make a template, stick the paper pattern to some 3mm or 1/8" mdf/ply/masonite  and then cut that out with the scrollsaw.  More durable than cardboard, no scissors involved.  

Wombat

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bl_smith25

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Reply with quote  #20 
Thank you Wombat.
I did my first set of ghosts today!
Not finished, just started sanding them and need to round off the rough spots.
For these small pieces and all the little contours, what do you use to get in all the little nooks and crannies?
They’re also pretty rough from my inexperience on the scroll saw so having difficulty at the moment smoothing them out.
Not sure if pictures show up like this or not but I’ll try and see.

Cheers,
B.L>
[image1.jpeg]

[image1]



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Wombat

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hi BL
I am hardly an expert on the scrollsaw myself, there's a lot of ladder above me yet.
So, like you, I need to do a bit of finishing.
 Being a tight-wad, I haven't bought a spindle sander. ( they don't seem to go below 1/2" diameter anyway )
 So I make do with fine-cut files, sandpaper wrapped around various size dowels or flat sticks, even sometimes just sandpaper rolled and squeezed flattish.
 It is a great incentive to learning more about blade selection, and as you get better scrollsawing, you need to sand less.

I also just bought a packet of Pegas Scroll sandpaper, that fits in the scrollsaw blade holder  ( or, it would if mine wasn't a different design, drat)  Google Pegas 90.6-240 to see images.
Current project is to craft an adapter so I can use these little beauties.

 BTW I love your benchtop

Wombat


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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #22 
My grandson named his the "Boo Crew".

20190919-065151 Handmade Wooden Halloween Ghost Cutouts - Set of 6 Sil.jpg 


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johndrees

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Reply with quote  #23 
looking good bob

bl_smith25

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Reply with quote  #24 
Thanks everyone for your tips and suggestions. I’m ordering the book and found another too.
I sanded mine down some more, then sliced them in half.
I also tried making one of the pumpkins. It actually turned out pretty good although it was SO SLOW!!! Taking the blade on and off so many times was horrible and I managed to break my first blade.
I also played around with the blade itself to use as a bit of a sander to smooth out the cuts and that worked pretty good and made for easier sanding.
Here is today’s progress. Half of them I put some food/baby safe mineral oil on them and the other half I was going to try painting. I didn’t get that far yesterday. Not sure whether I’ll do that or work on more cutouts today. I only did one pumpkin because I got frustrated with the blade in and out process being so time consuming because it’s not easy getting the blade through the wood and installed in the saw again. So one of the pumpkins is still to be done.
I was using 3/4” scrap pieces so after slicing them, they’re less than 3/8” now but still stand up. They remind me more of cookies than of wooden toys. 1/2” would probably be best, although I have a sheet of 5mm drawer bottom plywood that is really easy to cut so maybe I’ll try using that instead or slice the 3/4” wood before using the scroll saw. That just doubles the scroll saw and sanding time though.

B.L>
[image1.jpeg]

[image1]



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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #25 
Some videos for you to watch.

Scroll Saw Back to Basics by Hans Meier - (part 1)

Scroll Saw Back to Basics by Hans Meier - (part 2)


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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #26 
The easier blade changing is a game changer and one of the reasons scrollers are willing to pay for better saws.

This is the video that sent me looking for my EX21.

Test Cutting on the Excalibur 21" Scroll Saw

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Lexie

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Reply with quote  #27 
Hey BadBob,
I have a question for you. I tried to contact you via the contact info on your photo but there is no info. So my question is...I believe it was you who made a fleet of the "Gangster" cars, you had made a couple revisions to round some things like fenders etc. I should have saved a photo of what you posted but i didn't. If it was you who made that fleet of the "Gangster" car fleet could you post that photo/s again please or send me a link? I am interested in the plans but liked your alterations to them.
Thank you- Lexie Harvey

The post i am referring to i believe is probably 6 months old or more.
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #28 
Lexie, That was not me who posted those photos. Sorry, I can't help.

I checked my profile and a few others at random. It appears that all contact information has bee removed or else it is broken. You or any forum member ar welcome to contact be through any of the social media links listed in my signature block below. Unless, of course your question is off topic.

However, I think that you should publish your questions in the forum so the answers an be of benefit to everyone.

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Wombat

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Reply with quote  #29 
Lexie.
  I think the post you are looking for was done by GarryMac  and called FBI cars on 4/15
 However, as BadBob says , this question is not related to the "show us your spooks" post and should have been made as a separate query post.
 

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Lexie

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Reply with quote  #30 
Thank You Wombat, you saved the day. Searching FBI cars did not work but you providing the toy makers name did work! I was able to look up his posts via his name and find what i was looking for.
I agree maybe i should have posted under a different topic but i thought it was BadBob 's (old car post). I did try to send a message via this forum site but the contact info does not work like it used to, on the old Toy Forum site.
In any case, thank you for the info!
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