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sjc5454

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Reply with quote  #1 
I just got this shop tip in my daily email from Woodsmith Tips.
Here is the link to the whole article.

http://www.woodsmithtips.com/2014/12/04/smooth-wheels-circles/?utm_source=WoodsmithTips&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=8854

[w174_006f01]

This looks like something someone who makes their own wheels could use. I thought it was a very good tip and idea.
tara sun

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Reply with quote  #2 
looks great.
Udie

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Reply with quote  #3 
sjc5454 - I have been a subscriber to these tips from Woodsmith for a number of years, and have used many of their tips. Thanks for posting this great tip.
JTalbot

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Reply with quote  #4 
I like to use a shop made arbor, consisting of a nut and bolt. run the bolt thru the wheel, tighten the nut, and then chuck it in the drill press. It kind of works like a vertical lathe. I have sanding blocks of various grits, and even files nearby. This technique ensures perfectly round wheels that roll smoothly.
Jeremy

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Jeremy Talbot
1948CaseVAI

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Reply with quote  #5 
Add another vote for chucking up with a bolt and using the drill press.  It is fast, convenient and accurate.  Be sure to change set the speed of the drill press up fast for sanding wheels.  

I was able to use a long bolt and separate wheels with washers to chuck up five at a time for contouring.

 five_wheels.jpg

Udie

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Reply with quote  #6 
1948CaseVAI - I like the idea of contouring the wheels as well as ganging them up on one bolt.
But I do have a question - how did you contour the wheels? Did you use a rough file first or just use various grades of sandpaper?
   The ideas, tips and tricks from members like yourself are always exciting to see. Thank for posting.
1948CaseVAI

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Reply with quote  #7 
I used sandpaper in various grade, and the pic is of poplar.  I have not tried it with a really hard wood like oak and I am not sure it will work well.  For a wood like poplar I actually start with the see-through 'sanding screens' made for sheetrock mud.  It is really rough but porous so the dust goes right through and they do not load up.

A caution is in order though - please resist the temptation to use a gouge, chisel, or other tool like you would use with a lathe.  The drill press is NOT a lathe and it lacks the power and proper tool rest to safely use such tools. I am pretty strong and have gotten away with carefully using a Dremel 1/2 inch sanding drum on high speed against the rotating wheel chucked into the drill press - but you have to be vary careful else it will through the tool back at you.

Please be careful and safe, but with some experimentation it can be done safely and effectively.

1928 Chase VAI - Thanks for the sanding and safety tips - Udie
Muskokamike

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Posts: 153
Reply with quote  #8 
For my first wheels I used the drill press and sandpaper but you can easily get different sizes of wheels that way....(specially with pine).

I saw Canadian Tire had a corded drill on for $22.49 last week....(how can you resist?) so I bought one and made this.....that way you can control the diameter and when equipped with a tool rest, you can use gouges and stuff with it.......
drill lathe.JPG  drill lathe 2.JPG 

This shot is a variable speed "knob"...it's a 1/4 x 20 kd bolt that I tighten up against the trigger to control the speed.....now it isn't the best drill, but what do you want for 22 bucks? lol 

Udie

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Reply with quote  #9 
Muskokamike - You are absolutely right about Canadian Tire deals. When tools are 60 and 70 percent off, how can you not afford to buy a spare. And if you burn it out, bring it back within the warranty time and they will give you a new one. I've done that with a couple of routers.
Canadian Tire is something like Harbor Freight in the USA, but a little bit better than Princess Auto.
You need an electric drill or two, because the rpm's are much higher than the battery ones. Perfect for what you are showing, sanding, wire wheel, mop sander, etc.
   Cleaver idea using the 2x4 as well as your variable speed control, nice mod.
Muskokamike

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Posts: 153
Reply with quote  #10 
If you look, I use a 2 x 4 for the base too and can move the tool rest back and forth along it. Securing it again with the KD bolts......I haven't quite worked out the up and down adjustment on the tool rest, that's why it's missing in the pic.....

I don't have any lathe tools at the moment. What I do have is a mess of left over 1/4" steel rod left over from a job so I'm just going to shape the ends of those on a grinder until I can pick up anything better. It isn't tool steel but it will work fine on pine.....
Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #11 
I made some improvements, discoveries with my drill lathe....

I wanted to start turning wheels but the 1/4 x 20 nut on the end of a 1/4 threaded rod was getting in the way. I thought: when turning a bowl on a full sized lathe, they have a backing plate...what can I use....OH I know, a T nut with barbs on it....oh wait, that means I have to drill out the axle hole in the wheel to accommodate the 5/16" part of the T nut....

Hmmm I know, I'll put it on backwards and bend the barbs outwards.....guess what? They are pointing in the proper direction to grab onto the wheel too!
making wheels 3.JPG
(nevermind the washer, I forgot to take it off before threading the nut on). See the way the barbs bite into the wheel? The marks can be sanded off later.

As I was turning this wheel, I thought, I have to make many that are exactly the same. How to do it so they are all the same size and have the same details?

I put pencil marks on my temporary tool rest.....that shows me where to cut out the "wheel rim" and where to make the lines and the outside diameter

making wheels 2.JPG 
Now for the depth of the hub....how to ensure they are all the same? I put a piece of tape on my 1/4" chisel that lines out with the outside edge of the wheel...(sorry no pic of this). Now they MIGHT be .001 off, but who is going to notice?

 

Muskokamike

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Posts: 153
Reply with quote  #12 
Just want to mention these T nuts are available at Home Depot and Lowe's etc. in the KD fastener area.....if you want to turn bigger wheels they are also available in 5/16" dia too.......
JTalbot

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Reply with quote  #13 
I love the fact that the Canadians have a version of Harbor Freight! Like a toy store for grown men. I am planing on doing a post in the near future featuring my shop, and some of the things I do. Like making wheels. I saw someone post about mounting a bunch of wheels at once, I never thought of that before. I went out and tried it, brilliant!
Jeremy

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Jeremy Talbot
Udie

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Reply with quote  #14 
Jeremy (JTalbo) - So you tried the multiple wheel tip and it worked - great. Isn't it fantastic in the amount and kinds of tips and tricks being posted on the Forum. It is a real treat for me to see what has been posted each day and sounds like you are enjoying them also.
Muskokamike

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Posts: 153
Reply with quote  #15 
Yes it IS Udie.....one thing about the multi-wheel setup is you can make sure they're all exactly the same diameter at the same time.......

I made this jig to mark out the details on my custom wheels..helps keep them all alike. The center dowel is 1/4" which fits into the axle hole on the blank, the nails mark the inside hub diameter and the overall outside diameter......if I used HSS instead of brads, I could actually cut the shape instead of having to use a chisel.... wheel marking jig 2.JPG  wheel marking jig 1.JPG 
I tried this out last night (early this morning) and I popped off 4 wheels in about 15 minutes, including drilling out the blanks with a hole saw.....

One thing I'm thinking of doing (for repeatability) is to mount my chisel into a jig and mount it to a screw drive so I can feed it into the wheel at the same place every time....

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