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Udie

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Reply with quote  #16 
Muskokamike - That a really neat jig for repeatable markings. I'll be remembering that one, thanks.
Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #17 
Hey No problem....After making errr....10? wheels, you only need the center and the inside and outside pins on one side...since it's (supposedly) round, whatever you mark on one side will automatically occur on the other....

The brads hold up really well.....I actually deeply scored the marks onto the blank and they're still as sharp as when I put them in.....

Another thing: since you only have to put the brads on one side for the outside diameter and hub, you can use the other side for other details. Like the white walls I put on that red and black pickup. The white wall is only 1/8" wide and an 1/8" smaller than the "tire" so there wasn't room to put all the brads in. Now there's room on the other side.....

Since I have to make wheels for that land rover with the logo, I put the pickup tire pins on one end, and the land rover pins on the other so I only have to keep track of 1 jig as opposed to two....I guess you could put as many as you can fit on it...the 3/4" square piece is 12" long....
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #18 
I've made lots of wood wheels and I don't think the Woodsmith jig would well. You could probably make a few wheels with it but what if you need to make a 100 wheels. This will do it better that chucking your wheels in a drill press but not much.

The best thing I found to use was a belt sander. With 80 or 60 grit sand paper you can cut the wood into appropriate size squares, drill a hole in the center, mount it in your jig and grind it round. This makes lots of dust but its pretty fast. Disk sanders work well too.

You don't need an elaborate jig. I used a piece of wood with a dowel in it and a couple of stops clamped to the sander table.

I made a bunch of these.

00004124-1987-searsksx.jpg 







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Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #19 
That's great if you've got a belt or disc sander....how did you get the detail on the face of the wheel? Can you cut recesses?

The thing about using a hole saw: it comes out round already, you don't have to round it off on with a belt sander.....
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #20 
The detail on the wheels is a saw kerf just use a smaller hole saw first and just start the cut. You want to do the smaller cut first or you will be stuck trying to hold a wheel with out damaging it or your hand.

My prefered method is to use the hole saw. However, I consider this as a rough cut. I cut them larger than I need and sand them to size. Using a jig aand a sander to do this will allow you to make hundreds of wheels that are the same size, round and the edge square to the face of the wheel.

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Muskokamike

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Reply with quote  #21 
Yeah, it's great if you've got a belt or disc sander.....going to see about making one when I have time. I'm going to make one of the spindles around 1/4" diameter so I can use that end as a spindle sander, the other end larger, 1 1/4" and then the flat in the middle for flat surfaces.....

I tried to do a bunch with a recess in the middle and a hole saw. I drilled a 3/4" hole first with a forstner bit, then drilled the outside with a hole saw. I made a fence to hold the blank in line and thought, the pilot bit on the hole saw would automatically line up with the middle spike of the forstner bit, but oddly enough, it didn't for whatever reason. The center of the drill press quill should have been center no matter the size of the drill mounted in it.....the only thing I can figure is my table isn't 90 degrees to the plunge action of the quill so the farther the tip of the drill bit gets from the head, the farther back it moves......and there's NO adjustment for this.....
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #22 
Mount your jig on a piece of MDF or plywood and square it to the bit with shims or some other method. Or build a drill press table and square it.
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Udie

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Reply with quote  #23 
BadBob - Wheels, make them with a hole saw and the table saw.
Here' a link to a Forum post that shows you another way to make large quantities quickly.
Wheels - Hole Saw and Table Saw.
I think you may find this interesting.
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