Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
BadBob

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,626
Reply with quote  #1 
Spraying toys with shellac just isn't going to work for me. It's easy to spray through my Badger air brush but I live in Florida and I have to spray outdoors. Today the humidity dropped below 60% at my house for the first time in weeks These toys have been waiting on my bench for good weather all that time. Mostly the humidity has been 80-99% or raining. The upper limit for shellac is 80%. From my experience today I'd say at 80% and above it would be almost impossible to get a good finish. My theory is that the alcohol combines with the moisture in the air when you spray it. Causing all sorts of weirdness.

I tried spraying straight from the can, thinning it by various amounts spraying lightly and spraying heavy wet coats. nothing worked good enough for me. I quit when I had two cars that had water beaded up on top of the shellac.

Some of the cars listed below in the front I did with a brush and got much better results. It's even faster than spraying. I'm getting pretty good a applying shellac yo wooden toys with a brush.

Under good conditions, 40% humidity and warm temperatures I get good results. I need these for my store, I can't wait for perfect conditions. So it looks like no spraying shellac for me.

20170719_221800.jpg 


__________________
Advanced techniques are the basics perfectly applied.
Odin's Toy Factory Etsy Store
Facebook
Pinterest
Blogger
Forum Photo Album

LinkedIn
YouTube
Google Photos Toys Album

BadBob

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,626
Reply with quote  #2 
Lest you think I can't get a good finish spraying wooden toys with an airbrush and shellac. Consider this toy.

20170107-161551 Bat Car - Wooden Car - Batmobile - Play Pal - Toddler - Bat Mobile - Handmade - Handcrafted - Vehicle - Toys - Made In USA - Wooden Toy - Finished.jpgThis little wooden toy car was spray wit my badger airbrush. Under much better conditions than I was working in today. It came out very nice.




__________________
Advanced techniques are the basics perfectly applied.
Odin's Toy Factory Etsy Store
Facebook
Pinterest
Blogger
Forum Photo Album

LinkedIn
YouTube
Google Photos Toys Album

john lewman

Avatar / Picture

Owner, ToymakingPlans.com
Registered:
Posts: 2,873
Reply with quote  #3 
You are a master toymaker BadBob. This is some fine finishing. Beautiful!
Mikestoys

Registered:
Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #4 
I spray shellac a lot and I live in Florida as well ... and always have perfect results , nice and shiny. I don't thin shellac at all but I do one thicker coat let it dry for couple hours and then light sand it with 400 grit just to smooth out any bubbles or dust that have settled on there and then just spray it again with just light coat. And the results are great.

But I started to like Minwax Water based polyurethane as it dries a lot faster  than Shellac.

__________________
https://www.etsy.com/shop/woodproductsetc
BadBob

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,626
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikestoys
I spray shellac a lot and I live in Florida as well ... and always have perfect results , nice and shiny. I don't thin shellac at all but I do one thicker coat let it dry for couple hours and then light sand it with 400 grit just to smooth out any bubbles or dust that have settled on there and then just spray it again with just light coat. And the results are great.

But I started to like Minwax Water based polyurethane as it dries a lot faster  than Shellac.


I usually don't thin shellac but nothing else working. What I got was something that looks like an orange peal. If I sprayed very light coats I got finer textured orange peel. Thinning it caused finer orange peel, seemed to pick up even more moisture and was harder to control. There was also a small amount of blushing on a few pieces. Blushing is a cloudy area caused by moisture being trapped in the paint. When the humidity is high the cooling effect of the alcohol can cause moisture in the air to to condense into water. I think that what was causing the orange peel was tiny water droplets hitting the shellac. In a couple of cases I actually had water on the toy beaded up lie dew.

Another thing I thought of is that the humidity at my weather station may have been very different than where I was spraying in the shade. When I stopped the humidity at the weather station was 78% It could easily have been 90% in the micro climate I was working in.

I was getting desperate and took a chance. These toys have been sitting on my bench for weeks waiting for some finish. It has rained at my house everyday since 20 June and it was raining before that but I don't have records.  I installed a personal weather station on 20 June.

You can find lots of stuff about this sort of thing if you search Google. 

__________________
Advanced techniques are the basics perfectly applied.
Odin's Toy Factory Etsy Store
Facebook
Pinterest
Blogger
Forum Photo Album

LinkedIn
YouTube
Google Photos Toys Album

dmjones

Registered:
Posts: 155
Reply with quote  #6 
On this subject can someone tell me how to use shellac properly? I make toys with MDF and was told to put shellac on the cut edges to seal it with. I do that and then spray paint the toy and it literally takes weeks to dry. The shellac I am using is Zinsser brush on and then Valspar spray paint. Any input will be great. 

Baadbob-- good luck on your problems. Wish I could help you.

 
BadBob

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,626
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmjones
On this subject can someone tell me how to use shellac properly? I make toys with MDF and was told to put shellac on the cut edges to seal it with. I do that and then spray paint the toy and it literally takes weeks to dry. The shellac I am using is Zinsser brush on and then Valspar spray paint. Any input will be great. 

Baadbob-- good luck on your problems. Wish I could help you.

 


It's highly unlikely that the curing issue is caused from the shellac but its not impossible. I use the Zinsser shellac. Shellac is noted for its ability to seal and compatibility. It drys and cures very fast. I usually just brush it i on right from the can.

It's possible that it is the paint.  I've posted here about paint curing issues. Temperature and humidity are very important. All paints have a temperature and humidity range that they are recommended to work in. I find these to be wishful thinking on the outside edges (maximum and minimum) and try to stay in the middle somewhere.  

I have some unknown wood that shellac is the only thing I can get to cure on it. Without resorting to baking it in the oven at low temperature. 

Some of the patient I have used have this odd kind of sticky feel to them even though nothing sticks to them. It slowly goes away. 

You might want get the dry and cure times for your paint. There are some finishes that are dry after a few hours but don't cure for 30 days.  These are mostly oil and oil based finishes but I have used automotive enamels that were dry to the touch in an hour or so but you could not wash or wac the for a week after spraying because the paint was still soft underneath. Imagine my surprise when I discovered that the Quick dry polyurethane I bought can be recoated in an hour or two but takes 48 to 72 hours or more to cure. Dry and cure are not the same thing.  

Bottom line is you have to know your paint. 



__________________
Advanced techniques are the basics perfectly applied.
Odin's Toy Factory Etsy Store
Facebook
Pinterest
Blogger
Forum Photo Album

LinkedIn
YouTube
Google Photos Toys Album

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.