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BadBob

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I have been using Titebond No-Run, No-Drip Wood Glue for a few weeks in a recent project I tried several different types of glue to glue the legs on toy dinosaurs. If you have ever made these you know that getting the legs to align correctly is a challenge. Leg position is critical on the dinosaurs that stand on two legs only. I had four types of glue available.

  1. TiteBond II
  2. Aleene's All Purpose Tacky Glue
  3. Elmer's Glue-All Multi-Purpose Glue
  4. Titebond No-Run, No-Drip Wood Glue
All of them were slippery but, Titebond No-Run was by far the best. It moved less and set up faster than any of the others. All I had to do was hold the legs in place with a little pressure and then add the clamps. I guess that I didn't need the clamps. However, I'm not that confident.

I have almost stopped using TiteBond II for toys because of the color. I prefer glue that cures clear for painted toys.

Aleene's All Purpose Tacky Glue isn't tacky.  I started with Aleene's but after having to disassemble a couple of toys, clean the glue off of them, sand a reassemble them I decided to try other things. 

Elmer's is slippery and slides around just as bad as the first two.
 
While writing this, I decided that if I make more of these, I should make a template for attaching the legs.

20181217-202445 Handmade Wooden Toy - Baby Dinosaur 654458662.jpg 


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Teacherdave69

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Reply with quote  #2 
I am told that a TINY bit of salt can assist in preventing the sliding problem, or you could try superglue at the edges to hold while the permanent glue is drying. Hope this helps. BTW I am really liking your dinosaurs.
guyrossi

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I generally take a couple of small brads....hammer them  into one of the pieces to be glued...then cut them off with some electrical pliers or snips so there is only a small nib sticking up.  When you press/clamp the pieces together...they will not move. 

BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacherdave69
I am told that a TINY bit of salt can assist in preventing the sliding problem, or you could try superglue at the edges to hold while the permanent glue is drying. Hope this helps. BTW I really like your dinosaurs.


I tried the salt and found it very disappointing. It didn't move at all, and I need to be able to move some. I had to clamp it hard to get a tight joint.

If the super glue works, it will lock the legs into place with no chance of adjusting them.  When they are standing on two legs, I need to adjust a little to get the legs even and to get the balance right. 

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BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by guyrossi
I generally take a couple of small brads....hammer them into one of the pieces to be glued...then cut them off with some electrical pliers or snips so there is only a small nib sticking up.  When you press/clamp the pieces together...they will not move. 



Yes, that would lock them into place but, there would be no chance to adjust them for correct balance. These are hard oak. I'm not sure I could drive brads into them without some risk of damaging the toy.  I'd probably need to drill pilot holes.  I'd be upset if I broke the toy driving nails into it. I'm also not a big fan of using metal in my toys.

I considered using a pin nailer but, they are a little unpredictable.

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Trav

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Reply with quote  #6 
I've made a number of these dinosaurs. Getting the legs to align is indeed a pain sometimes. I use gorilla wood glue but I have to align them against a 90 degree angle to get them lined up. Its a real pain with the two-legged ones as I've had to knock the legs off once or twice to get the balance right.
Loggerlaws

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Reply with quote  #7 
Maybe try and find the centre of the circular part of the top of the leg and then on the back side nail a fine brad at that point and then temporary fix the leg, trial and error  with the other end of the brad, then mark the position and then glue them in place. I hope this is in plain english.

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Reply with quote  #8 
When making legs on any toy even with each other I glue on one leg and let it dry. Then I hold the toy in a standing position and glue and clamp the other leg onto the toy in the perfectly level standing position. It works every time.
BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lewman
When making legs on any toy even with each other I glue on one leg and let it dry. Then I hold the toy in a standing position and glue and clamp the other leg onto the toy in the perfectly level standing position. It works every time.


That is what I wound up doing. This glue is tacky and has a short working time so you don't need to wait two hours before gluing on the other leg. 


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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #10 
The plans have full-size drawings. I print one of these and put the body on top and align the leg visually with the drawing. Once the glue cures enough to hold it in place, I can glue on the other leg and align it with the first.

As long as the wood has even density this works. I use a board standing on its edge to make sure the bottoms of the feet are aligned. After the glue cures, I can tweak the balance with a little sanding.

If you were to make these out of random pieces of construction lumber where the density varies a lot balancing gets to be more of an issue.
 
"Titebond No-Run, No-Drip Wood Glue" makes this process much more manageable.
 

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harry

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Reply with quote  #11 
I only use Titebond 3. Does the new glue you are using dry clear?
BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry
I only use Titebond 3. Does the new glue you are using dry clear?



Yes, it drys clear.

It is quite thick — the thickness becomes a bit of a problem at lower temperatures. This weekend I made a stand to hold the bottle upside down so I would not need to wait so long for the glue to run down to the tip. The sand is a block of 2x4 with a hole drilled in it. Nothing fancy.

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Trav

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Reply with quote  #13 

John, that's basically the technique I use. One leg first, then the other.

One tricky part, I find, is when putting the legs on the bipedal dinosaurs. Putting a clamp on them alters the centre of gravity. So they might stand up fine with the clamp on, but when you remove it, it tips over. I learned that the hard way. I usually tape both legs on now to get the positioning right. Then I mark them and glue the legs on one at a time. Then I'm confident to put the clamp on and know the centre of gravity is right.

The four-legged ones are easy.

jrlawjr

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Reply with quote  #14 
Bob:

I use Titebond Translucent.  It has similar properties to the no run-no drip but I think it is thinner.  It dries clear and sets quickly.  They say you only have to clamp it for 30 minutes.  It is hard to find as I have to order it from Amazon but I am very happy with it.  I use it for all my woodworking.

Jim
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #15 
Titebond No-Run, No-Drip Wood Glue seems to be the same or nearly the same as  Titebond Quick & Thick Multi-Surface Glue. The specs and descriptions are almost identical.

The short open time is why I like it. At 70 degrees, the open time is 3 minutes. I can hold the pieces with my hand and feel it tighten up.  After about a minute, I can get the clamps on without anything moving but still make small adjustments if I need to.

I have to order this from Amazon. It's not available locally.

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