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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #1 
Because of some questions I was asked recently and some projects I'm working on I was looking for a definitive answer to the question: Does shellac work was a primer for acrylic craft paint?

I found this little article by  Michael Dresdner.



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Miriam Janssen

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Reply with quote  #2 
yes, it does.
I use shellac a lot as a primer for both acrylic paint and wax.
It should be applied very thin. The shellac works perfect as a sealer for the end Grain.
The bare wood takes less water from the acrylic paint. I still needed 3 layers of coloured paint.

- Miriam -

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BadBob

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Reply with quote  #3 
Generally for craft paint it takes three coats of paint. Exceptions are the darker colors and or thicker paints.

When using bright/lighter colors I like to use white as the first and or second coat.

Sealing with shellac definitely cuts down on the amount of sanding I do.


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Chantel mdv

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi, I need you advice. I am doing a puzzle with wooden cubes. I have used Shellac as a sealer, then painted  on the wood (acrylic paint). I used a Staedler Permanent black marker to outline the shapes of the drawings. But when I applied Shellac as a non toxic child finition, the black lines drooled. I was so disappointed.

I can't imagine doing straight lines with a fine paintbrush to do the contours of my drawings... Any advice?

thanks
BadBob

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A lot of inks can be dissolved with alcohol. Before I would use anything over ink of any kind I would try it with a test piece first.

I did a bit of searching around. The pen toy want is one of these or something like it:

Statmark Pen: resistant to formalin, ethanol, isopropanol and xylene

Ethanol and isopropanol are alcohols.  The solvent in the shellac is alcohol.

You can probably get these at a place that sells laboratory supplies.

There are paint pens that might do the job for you and there are epoxy inks but I don't think epoxy will work for you.

If you ink is water proof you might try one of the water based finishes.




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Ceefa

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Reply with quote  #6 
I'm very interested to see that many of the toymakers use acrylic craft paints to paint their toys. I have always used acrylic house paints in test pots to paint my toys and find them not needing a primer. I just paint straight on to the wood. Colours like yellow and blue sometimes need an extra coat as they do not cover too well.

They are thicker and i finish off with a water-based gloss polyurethane and then perhaps a clear gloss from a spray can and it seems to work very well.  For those Aussies and Kiwis in the group I have always used Resene paints.
BadBob

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceefa
I'm very interested to see that many of the toymakers use acrylic craft paints to paint their toys. I have always used acrylic house paints in test pots to paint my toys and find them not needing a primer. I just paint straight on to the wood. Colours like yellow and blue sometimes need an extra coat as they do not cover too well.

They are thicker and i finish off with a water-based gloss polyurethane and then perhaps a clear gloss from a spray can and it seems to work very well.  For those Aussies and Kiwis in the group I have always used Resene paints.


I use both.

One reason is that acrylics craft paints are available in many color that are not available as house paint. Metallics for example. Craft paint is readily available in lots of stores in a large variety of colors.

I generally find house paint to cover much better than than craft paint and more durable. Craft paint is lots more forgiving of weather temperature and humidity levels. I've learned the hard way to check the humidity before using house paint. I think I prefer the exterior house paint over the other types.

I've done a cost per ounce price comparison and the craft paints are cheaper but only if I buy them at Wal-Mart. House paint wins the cost game when you buy oops paint. However, oops paint severely limits the color choices to what ever they mess up. I've had some mixed results with oops paint and my suspicion is that some times the oops isn't just the color but fifty cents for a pint of paint is hard to resist so I check the oops paint every time I go into Home Depot.

Lately I have purchased samples direct for the Behr web site. The ship it driectly to my Home Depot.



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gonetopilbara

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi all,

I just made my first lot of dewaxed shellac by dissolving it in methylated spirits.

I though 1ml would be 1 gram with the spirits so it appears I have mixed it at a slightly higher dilution rate than a 1lb cut.

I know i could just add more shellac to the mix, but would the current mix be ok?

What cuts (1,2,3lb etc) do people here use?

Also, I am intending to use it to prime mdf and then paint with colours. Is one coat enough and do I still need to seal edges of cut mdf or will the shellac do the trick?

A few questions in here, so I am hoping someone can help answer them for me.
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #9 
One coat should be plenty unless you sand a lot. I find that as soon as I apply the shellac I'll start seeing defects that were not visible before. Put on a coat. sand with some fine sandpaper. If you like the result your done. Repeat until you have a surface you like. 

I use shellac that comes in a can. Right out of the can most of the time. 


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gonetopilbara

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Reply with quote  #10 
Another question relating to shellac.

I am making the Henny Penny toy out of MDF and have sealed the edge I will paint with Gesso.

Do I also need to prime/seal with shellac or could I have sealed the MDF with Shellac only?

I am intending to paint with acrylic and a brush

Regards,

Bill
BadBob

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonetopilbara

Do I also need to prime/seal with shellac or could I have sealed the MDF with Shellac only?


You could have sealed it with shellac. The shellac will not swell the MDF like the water-based solutions. You can apply the paint directly the MDF and sand a little more. 

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