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flamepainter

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,
    Because of all the positive comments about my "latest creations" post, I thought I would share a couple things with all of you. I don't know how many use an airbrush but it seems by the posts I read that airbrushing is not super popular with this group. I like using an airbrush because you have a lot more control of your spray. I don't have real expensive equipment. I do have four airbrushes that I have collected over the years but the main one I use is the least expensive one. It is from Harbor Freight and only cost about $16.00 after using a 20% off coupon (plus cost of air hose for it). You can use any compressor, in fact for many years I used a cheap 1 gallon air compressor I had bought years ago for about $50.00. It served me well but I decided this year to upgrade to an airbrush air compressor because it is much quieter. It has served me well so far. I also purchased it at Harbor Freight for about $55.00 after using a 20% off coupon. The compressor has a hose for the airbrush with it but I bought it after I bought the airbrush. Anyway, I also use acrylic, water based craft paints mostly that I buy at craft stores and any department store craft department. I really like using these paints because they are very cheap, they go a long way because you have to thin them for airbrush use. My wife and I both do quite a bit of crafts with paints so, we have collected a LOT of paint colors over the years (hundreds). They last a long time as long as you don't let them dry up. I also want to mention that you can buy less expensive airbrushes and they should serve you well, depending on what type of airbrushing you want to do.
airbrush.jpg  airbrush compressor.jpg 
I hope this helps anyone who is "on the fence" about airbrushing. It really is easy after you get used to how much to thin the paint. If you can, I would highly recommend getting an airbrush and small compressor and giving it a go. Hope everyone is staying safe.
Jim

Camnight

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi flamepainter  I am one that has been sitting on the fence. I have had a small kit i brought, compressor and airbrush Almost 12 month ago never open. I have been watching your work and have been very impress. Thank for you advice I think I will get out and try some airbrushing. I do waste a lot of paint when using spray cans. Thank again for making up my mind to try. George 👍
flamepainter

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi George. I'm glad my article had some positive effect on you. I would highly recommend you watch some you tube videos for how to thin the paint. I also would recommend you get some paper or cardboard and practice as much as you can. If you get some of the craft paints, you can get by very cheap and use water to thin it. Good luck, if there is anything I can help you with, let me know.
Jim
Lexie

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you for posting info on the airbrush kit. As a newbie wood crafter i have been sticking to rustic style items, but if that Harbor Freight air brush has good spray results i will gladly give it a try when i start using some flashy 1950's colors on my "vintage 50's" items i plan to make around xmas.

H.F. has a low end reputation, but i have many of their tools and they are working fine for what i do. I bought their trim router ($22) and yes even though it has a lot of plastic parts that i wish were metal...i have to admit it is doing a shockingly good job for my soft wood projects (all i use is pine), I also bought an angle grinder, small air compressor, nail gun, drill bits, sanding grit belts, paint brushes etc.

I am on the fence, thinking of buying a basic Kreg pocket hole jig (obviously not to build toys with, but to build other useful items for around the house (storage racks, planter boxes etc).
$40-50 is pricey for me just to buy a screw jig, when i can just do my usual pre-drill the hole and use a standard wood screw and if i'm feeling fancy i use a counter sink bit.
Anyone here think a pocket hole jig is something i should not be without? Let me know.
flamepainter

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Posts: 164
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Lexie,
    I agree, Harbor Freight does have a poor reputation and in some cases, it might be warranted but I also have a lot of HF tools that have served my needs well. Some of the things I have of theirs has lasted me several years, the way I use them. Also, if you Google the SKU number from the package, you can get some you tube videos and reviews of the airbrush. I have included a file that is, in my opinion, an honest review of the airbrush. It is by a guy that really knows airbrushes and gives the pros and cons of this airbrush. I found it interesting. I looked at this before I bought mine and it did help me make the decision. Anyway, I hope this helps. Good luck. Unfortunately, I can't give you any advice on the pocket hole jig. I know that a lot of people swear by it, but I don't have much use for one.
Jim

 
Attached Files
pdf Airbrush review.pdf (972.07 KB, 23 views)

Lexie

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks Flamepainter,
That airbrush article was really good. The spray point gets as focused as i will ever need from what the article showed. Tomorrow I am going to buy that air brush and a brad point wood drill bit set that HF seems to always be sold out of. I hope also HF has a set of extra glass jars for the air brush so i can mix up 2- 3 colors at a time.
flamepainter

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lexie
Thanks Flamepainter,
That airbrush article was really good. The spray point gets as focused as i will ever need from what the article showed. Tomorrow I am going to buy that air brush and a brad point wood drill bit set that HF seems to always be sold out of. I hope also HF has a set of extra glass jars for the air brush so i can mix up 2- 3 colors at a time.


You're welcome, I'm glad that review helped. Also, I just bought that brad point drill bit set last week. I've only used a couple of them so far. The 1/4" bit seemed to be a little dull but as long as I go slow, it works pretty good, especially for the price. The airbrush does not come with a hose to connect to a compressor so make sure you get that too unless you are also getting the compressor shown above.
Jim
john lewman

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Flamepainter for inspiring me to switch from spray cans to airbrushing. This is so helpful to me. I used the airbrush for product design illustrations until Photoshop was launched about 20 some years ago. That is when I gave my airbrush and compressor to a nephew. Photoshop has a super airbrush tool. The problem is you can't spray paint actual objects with it. I am going to immediately get an airbrush setup put together in my shop for crafts paints and dump all the spray cans. I will use an airbrush clear gloss to get the sheen I desire.

Below are two airbrushed images of designs I created in the past. The Hippie Van design is a hand-held physical airbrush image. It took over 40 hours to create due to all the masking, color mixing and spraying required with a hand-held airbrush. I designed this nutty thing on request from a client in 1970 who had more money than brains. Yes, it was built and he loved it. It cost him over $50,000 in 1971. He was 27 years old and had inherited a ton from his deceased father.

HIPPYVAN.jpg 
The black roadster below was a concept sketch for another rich client. It was created in Photoshop using the airbrush tool and required just 2 hours to complete from concept sketch to a printed out full color rendering. The downside was that it took me ten years of computer design experience to do that in 2 hours.

pistol12 (1).jpg  Thanks again Flamepainter. I am embarrassed that it has taken me 20 years to see the value of using an airbrush in my workshop!

 

flamepainter

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Reply with quote  #9 
You are welcome John. Great work on those cars. I have enjoyed using an airbrush for probably about 20 years. Once I got one and practiced with it, I realized how much control I have of where the spray goes and how much material goes on the object. I have not gotten into fine detail work (yet) but for what I use it for, it is great. I am now inspired to get out all my airbrushes and practice with them to actually compare the differences.
Jim
Lexie

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Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Jim,
I did buy the airbrush and air hose today. Should i buy a quick connect from the airbrush to the air hose? HF had none, but Amazon has this...pictured (i already had a quick connect for the compressor end to air hose). My compressor is the 3 gallon no oil, that HF sells ($40).

On the brad tip wood bits, yeah i figure for $15 for a full set of bits, that it would not be high end, but it should make drilling a bit more accurate for basic hand held drilling.

airbrush connector.jpg

flamepainter

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Posts: 164
Reply with quote  #11 
I have those for my Paasche airbrushes and they leak a little bit. I bought them from Paasche and don't know why they leak. I took them off. In my opinion, unless you are going to change from one airbrush to another frequently, they really aren't needed. The connector on the airbrush is easy enough to disconnect and connect. Just my two cents worth there. If you would feel more comfortable with the quick connect, by all means, get it and try it out. You might find that it is better for you. The compressor you have should be plenty sufficient for you. Just make sure it has a regulator so you can regulate the output.
Jim
PaPa Jack

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hello Flamepainter !  Your articles are great.  I tried my first painting job this week and it was disaster!  I have too many questions to ask on the forum.  I have been fighting painting for years and your post has stirred my interest again.   Is there any chance we could talk real time.  Jack Burgess  817-538-6867
flamepainter

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaPa Jack
Hello Flamepainter !  Your articles are great.  I tried my first painting job this week and it was disaster!  I have too many questions to ask on the forum.  I have been fighting painting for years and your post has stirred my interest again.   Is there any chance we could talk real time.  Jack Burgess  817-538-6867

      Hi Jack. Since you are only one time zone away, it shouldn't be too much of a problem. Let me know when is good for you and I will try to work something out.
Jim
flamepainter

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Reply with quote  #14 
I'll tell you what PapaJack, e-mail me with your questions at flamepainter286@gmail.com so I'll have an idea of what some of the questions are, in case I need to do any research on them. Then we can talk on the phone if you would like.
Jim
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