BadBob
What is the most durable wood to make toys from?

I'm making toy animals. Getting the grain direction optimal for all the parts is difficult at best and nearly impossible for some of them. One of my toys was broken when it was dropped. I would rather not have this happen. I'm making a woolly mammoth for my grandson and shop made plywood for the tusks because I was sure they would break off easily if I didn't.

Many toy designs seem to give little thought to things like grain direction. 

I made this one with the grain running up the neck because I thought that would break easily if I didn't.

20181224-194819 Handmade Wooden Toy Dinosaur Brontosaurus Apatosaurus .jpg 

Here is what happened to it.

Broken Dinosaur 002.jpg 

Broken Dinosaur 001.jpg 


Advanced techniques are the basics perfectly applied.
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john lewman
My favorite wood for toys with break-off areas is walnut. I have found it super durable. That said, most very fie grained hardwoods are durable the same way.
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Bourbon
you will always get short grain somewhere. fast grown softwood will break real easy. The locos I posted are the same, the back of the cabs break off. a slower grown hardwood will be better but will still be a weak spot

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BadBob
Bourbon wrote:
you will always get short grain somewhere. fast grown softwood will break real easy. The locos I posted are the same, the back of the cabs breaks off. a slower grown hardwood will be better but will still be a weak spot



I understand there are always weak spots but, if I can mitigate the risk by choosing a different wood I would love to do that. What I don't want is to have the toy break within a few days from bringing dropped.  That is what happened to the toy I posted.
 
 
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craigrozema
I've had the most luck with maple. Almost everything I've made in oak has cracked at the weak points and im stuck gluing them back together. 
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BadBob
craigrozema wrote:
I've had the most luck with maple. Almost everything I've made in oak has cracked at the weak points and im stuck gluing them back together. 



I was afraid of that. I have a bunch of oak and it's redily available.

Thanks




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BadBob
Anyone using hickory?

I looked at a chart with a lot of detail about wood. Hickory is on the top for strength. No domestic hardwoods (US) are even close.
 
 
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Bucko
Bob I used Hickory for 1 small car and it’s so heavy I was concerned of it being dropped on toes and didn’t use any more .
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Bourbon
as you have a supply of Oak, try putting some dowels in across the grain, before it breaks. That's my only suggestion and I don't even know if it would work

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BadBob
Bourbon wrote:
as you have a supply of Oak, try putting some dowels in across the grain, before it breaks. That's my only suggestion and I don't even know if it would work




It would work in some cases. I have used bamboo skewers to repair broken toys. It would work in some places but would leave a different colored dot and add extra steps to the build.
 
I would like to avoid adding extra steps the build if possible.
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griff2379
Hi Bob 
A wood you might try is Sycamore. It is close grained and plain white. In the UK it is used by a friend of mine who makes clogs (wooden working shoes/boots ) for a living. They undergo percussive use as they hit the floor.
If you can get it Ash will accept "bashing".
Hope this helps
Griff
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gsmith89
Bob I have good luck with poplar and maple.
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