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Peter V

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Reply with quote  #16 
Frank,

welcome ... and what I see, beautiful.

It awakens a lot of questions:

- what is Renshape for (kind of) wood? I cannot find it in the dictionary.

- How do you make those wheels. You wrote 'on a lathe' but I mean the spokes etc.

- the tyres, what are these made of?

- the headlights (and taillights) are made of .....?

I am very eager to learn

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Greetings,

Peter V
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Reply with quote  #17 
Hello again Peter and Merry Christmas from Canada!

I have put together a reply to your request with lots of pictures and text and it has become quite lengthy.   I think it would be best for me to post it on the other modelling forum I belong to  ... Britmodeller.com.   When I get it posted I will put the link on this site and anyone from this forum will be able to look at it.   It may take a few more days since it is the holiday season.

As for your questions ... I can answer them today.

Reshape is a man-made composite product (also sold as Ureol) and it is made for the pattern-making industry.   It is waterproof, comes in several hardnesses, sands to a fine finish and takes fine details ... also expensive!   I get free cut-off pieces from a factory near me.

However, a good alternative is more readily available and is sold in building supply stores as planks for an outdoor deck or a boat dock.   This is a very similar composite product and I once used it to build a large boat model.   A bonus is that the manufacturers of these building materials almost all offer a free sample pack!!   Google "Free samples composite decking".

The spokes:  You will see how I apply the wire to make my spokes when I post the article.   Over the years I have purchased many different types of wire to test as spoke material.   It needs to be close to the correct thickness to represent a spoke in the scale you are using and it must not be too stiff or it won't give a straight enough spoke.   

Here in Canada there is a hobby known as beading where people buy glass beads and string them onto wire to make bracelets and necklaces and there are businesses devoted to that hobby.    I was amazed to see the range of wires they sell for this purpose as they come in many hardnesses, thickness and even colour.

Tyres:   I make them from Renshape.

Headlights:   I have a long piece of clear acrylic rod (salvaged from a bathroom towel rack) which I turn on my lathe to headlight size and polish (wet sandpaper) to a fine finish.

Tail-lights:  These are just different coloured plastics that I get from medicine bottles, old broken (real) tail-lights from a car.   I have even bought red and a yellow replacement lenses for a tractor at a farm supply store ... very cheap.    Use the Dremel to shape the lens you need.

My hobby is called scratch building Peter.   I like to make every piece of every model by hand ... that means no kit parts ever!    I collect materials for my builds by taking apart old machines such as computers, hard drives, heat sinks, cameras, printers, video equipment etc etc.   I separate all the aluminium, steel, plastic and save all the tiny nuts and bolts found especially in a camera.   I occasionally buy some aluminium or brass plate when needed.

There's a lot here to digest so I'll stop now.   I'll be happy to help you understand the wheel making process or any other aspect of what I do ... just ask.

Here's one of my favourite creations.   It's the Flying Scotsman locomotive that I used to see as a boy growing up in Scotland.   Every piece is hand made, cut, filed, polished, painted.

Frank

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woodencarguy

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hello Peter

I posted my article today so you can go here and read it.   Let me know if I can be of assistance.

Frank
Grandpa Bear

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Reply with quote  #19 
WOW !!! The Flying Scotsman is simply superb.

You are an extremely talented model builder, must have taken a long time to make and build?

It's a real beauty, a show stopper
woodencarguy

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Reply with quote  #20 
Thanks Grandpa.

I appreciate your comment.   Yes, I started it about 15 years ago and I pick away at it now and then.   Lots of little pieces are made and waiting to be attached but ... new projects always seem to take the stage and I'm well into another old LNER engine so the Scotsman will have to wait even longer!

Cheers

Frank


Peter V

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Reply with quote  #21 

Frank,

I red your article on Britmodeller, very interesting indeed, and I do have some questions about it.

I saw at your 'presentation' that you made 23 slots for the spokes. 

My question is, is there a certain sequence in wiring?

I mean, you start for instance at slot 1, then around the hub to the opposite slot 12, returning via 13, again around the hub to slot 2, working the wheel around clockwise?

Or is is just all at random?


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Greetings,

Peter V
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Reply with quote  #22 
Hello Peter

Glad you found the article and I hope it is useful.   

As I said in the "Disclaimer" I'm more interested in HOW to make things and I don't get too concerned whether I have the right number of spokes or rivets etc.    If I was a younger man I might do otherwise.

If this sort of precision concerns you ... and as a serious modeller it should. you should cut the number of slots to give you the correct number of spokes.   For a 72 spoke  wheel you need 36.   Now, if you are working on a smaller scale wheel than what I usually use ... 1/18th then it will become more difficult to cut so many slots and the prongs will become smaller and easier to break.

As to your question regarding the order in which to wire the loom ... there is no need to have a particular order as long as you end each layer with a spoke in every slot.  But the order that you've noticed ... 1, 12, 13, 2 then 3, 14, 15, 4 etc is the tidiest.   If you do go randomly you might end up with a lot of wire on the outside of the loom especially after you have wired the outer layer and it might be a tight fit into the wheel rim.   Also, a random sequence can sometimes make for an untidy appearance around the central hub.

I hope this answers your question and I'll be happy to answer any other questions.

Frank



Peter V

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Reply with quote  #23 
good afternoon Frank,

thanks for your explanation and that the order that I noticed was correct. It is now clear to me.




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Greetings,

Peter V
woodencarguy

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Reply with quote  #24 
Hello Peter

I'm glad things are clear for you now.

I found a picture of another method I tried and discarded but you might find it useful.   It's quite a bit simpler to make as there's no central wiring apparatus.   As you can see from my picture below it only requires holes to be drilled for spokes to be laced through.   It uses the same central hub around which you thread the spokes.   Also different is the fact that the rim is a single piece with the back still attached so it''s much easier to make.

The reason I discarded the idea was that I couldn't get the spoke wire to pull tightly enough to straighten them and it just looked awful.   The problem is that the drilled holes have a sharp edge and the wire gets stuck on them.    However, I've since found wires that are thinner and more like heavy thread and they might work.   I believe that if you could find a suitable thread/wire this might produce a very nice wheel with a lot less work.  Let me know please if you decide to try it.

Frank 



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